Architect of His Own Success: Samuel Bolton Ashworth – Jamie Yates

Architect of His Own Success: Samuel Bolton Ashworth – Jamie Yates

Samuel Bolton Ashworth was an amateur left-half of the early 1900s. Born 11 March 1877 in Fenton, Stoke-on-Trent, the son of a Mr. Thomas Ashworth who served as manager of Glebe Colliery, and Betsy Bolton; he was one of 10 children and played youth football with a succession of local sides in the Staffordshire leagues, before joining Football League founder members Stoke City for the 1901/02 season. In two seasons at Stoke, Sam Ashworth made 39 league and cup appearances, filling each of the half-back roles, but never scoring a goal – he never troubled the scorers once in his entire league and cup career. After losing his position in the Stoke City side during his second season, Everton made enquiries about signing the neat, diminutive Ashworth to bolster their own options at half-back. For whatever reason and, despite Ashworth himself publicly stating his preference for a move to Goodison Park, Manchester City stepped in and he appeared for them...
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Andrew Hannah, The only man to Captain Everton & Liverpool – David Prentice

Andrew Hannah, The only man to Captain Everton & Liverpool – David Prentice

Everton Heritage Society and Everton Football Club rededicate grave of important football figure The only man in history to captain Everton and Liverpool lies in a marked grave for the first time thanks to the efforts of the Everton Heritage Society and Everton Football Club. Andrew Hannah, who captained Everton to their first League Championship success in 1891, then led Liverpool to Lancashire League and Football League Division Two titles, had lain in an unmarked grave at Kilbowie Cemetery in Clydebank since his untimely passing in 1940. On Saturday Everton Heritage Society Chairman Brendan Connolly and former Echo Sports Editor Ken Rogers attended a ceremony at Kilbowie Cemetery along with Everton FC ambassador Ian Snodin to rededicate the grave and ensure that one of football’s most important figures had his achievements duly recognised.                                                                     Everton's 1891 champions, captained by Andrew Hannah (front left) Born...
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From Leicester Fosse to Leicester City…

The Premier League champions are at Goodison Park this afternoon but did you know that the club played for 25 years after its formation before becoming Leicester City? Today’s visitors were formed in 1884 by a group of young men from a local evangelical chapel who decided to form a football team that they chose to call Leicester Fosse. This suffix was selected because the old Roman Road, known as the Fosseway, had once passed through the area. The group then all agreed to pay nine old pence membership fee and another nine pence was collected to purchase a football. They then played at several different locations before, according to local folklore, a certain Miss Westland suggested they construct an enclosure at a site on Walnut Street which, in turn, became Filbert Street. Leicester Fosse first played in the Midland League before being elected to the Football League Division Two in 1893. In 1908 they gained promotion to the top flight and faced...
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When Babe met Dixie Dean – Ryan Ferguson (permission given)

As was the capricious, romantic and, in some cases, downright fictitious nature of news reporting in the United States during his rise to prominence, myth and mystery surrounds pretty much everything Babe Ruth ever did. His Called Shot during the 1932 World Series, for instance, is still shrouded in uncertainty, just like the fable that he once hit a Fall Classic home run to fulfil the last wishes of a sick kid in New Jersey. There’s no way to tell for sure whether these wondrous feats actually occurred, thanks in large part to the cliquey journalism culture of the age. In those days, beat writers were paid by the team they covered and, frequently, they travelled on the same trains, slept in the same hotels, and drank in the same bars as the players, managers and executives. Thus, whether by design or osmosis, the work of said writers was typically drenched in hyperbole and fabrication, especially when it came to the eminence...
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