Keys and Warmby — The Duo from Derby

In preparation for life in the Football League, Everton Football Club made several new signings during the summer of 1888. Two of them, Keys and Warmby, had joined them from Derby County. Despite the fact that the local newspapers make no reference to their background, they were in fact related by marriage and had reached the Mersey Seaport by two slightly different routes. William Henry Warmby was born, 1863, in South Yorkshire where he began his football career with his local team, Rotherham Town. Sometime around 1883 he moved to Derby where he took up a job as an engine fitter (Midland Railway?) and played his football with a team made up of players from the congregation at the church of St Luke. They were one of the lesser known teams in the town and played on a small ground at Peat Street. On November 8th, 1884 they travelled to face Wolverhampton Wanderers in an FA Cup tie, on their home...
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Jack Cock – Scorer, Singer, Soldier, Superstar

EVERTON HISTORY Jack Cock – Scorer, Singer, Soldier, Superstar ROB SAWYER (EFC HERITAGE SOCIETY) 18/11/2016 Relatively few Cornishmen have represented Everton but several have left their mark on Merseyside. Mike Trebilcock carved his name into FA Cup folk-lore whilst Nigel Martyn established himself as the finest Goodison goal-keeper since Neville Southall. However, the most remarkable life story is that of Jack Cock: international footballer, team manager, war hero and star of stage and screen. John Gilbert “Jack” Cock, the third child of James (an iron-trimmer) and Eliza, entered the world on 15 November 1893 in the Cornish village of Phillack, close to the port town of Hayle. By the time Jack was seven James had relocated the family from this bucolic setting to Fulham in West London. Jack would earn pocket money selling chocolates to spectators inside Craven Cottage and dream of becoming a footballer. Such hopes faded when James' work took the family to the footballing backwater of Camborne in Cornwall. Nevertheless Jack...
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Everton in 1915 – Pete Jones

1915 was a bittersweet year for Everton FC. The 1914-15 season was played entirely during wartime and was probably the most controversial ever, resulting in divisions within sport that still find echoes today, and yet Everton were able to celebrate their second league title. Before a ball was kicked British forces became locked in a constant struggle alongside the French against a German army that was the best in the world. By the time Everton lifted the trophy in late April the British had suffered appalling losses, with the original expeditionary force all but destroyed; that the war had lasted until the spring of 1915 with no sign of a conclusion was a surprise to almost everyone. Although press censorship kept the home public unaware of the realities of the war, the twists and turns of the 1914-15 season must have diverted them from their anxieties. For Everton fans in the trenches the arrival of the results must have been what...
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Why Leicester Fosse? – by Tony Onslow

History will be made today when the present Premier League champions take to the field for what is their first ever FA Cup tie at Goodison Park. The visitors were formed in 1884 by a group of young men from a local evangelical chapel who decided to form a football team that they chose to call Leicester Fosse. This suffix was chosen because the old Roman Road, known as the Fosseway, had once passed through the area and a military encampment was “set up” to protect it from attack near to the spot where it forded the River Soar. The group then all agreed to pay nine old pence membership fee and another nine pence was collected to purchase a football. They then played at several different locations before a certain Miss Westland, as local folklore has it, suggested they constructed an enclosure at a site known on Walnut Street which, in turn, became Filbert Street.   Leicester Fosse Football Club...
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Everton in 1916 – Pete Jones

1916 was dominated by the battle of the Somme which marked the point in WW1 when British and Commonwealth troops started to shoulder a major part of the fighting on the Western Front. The Somme also saw the deaths of five men who had played for three football clubs called Everton. The first day, 1st July 1916 was a disaster, with nearly 20,000 killed and 40,000 wounded. Among them was 2nd Lt. Malcolm Fraser of the Cameronians who was killed in the afternoon leading a patrol into no man’s land near Ovillers. His commanding officer wrote that his sacrifice meant a planned attack was called off probably saving hundreds of lives. Malcolm Fraser was born in New York State to a Scottish father and an American mother; he was a founder member of the Everton club in Valparaiso in Chile and was at university in Edinburgh when war broke out. He has no known grave and is remembered on the Thiepval...
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Everton and Lille

By Pete Jones 05/10/2014 It is a surprising fact but Everton have never played a French club in competitive action, so our visit to Lille on Thursday 23 October will be a first. However, there are Everton links to the Lille area, but you have to go back nearly a century to find them. The Great War Lille, the largest city in northern France was in the war zone in the autumn of 1914 after the German invasion was halted at the battle of the Marne. The fighting moved ever north as both sides tried to outflank each other. Lille fell after a short siege on 13th October and the focus of the fighting moved to the higher ground between the city and the Belgian town of Ypres 17 miles to the north west . Here the Germans brought up hastily gathered reserves and attempted to punch through to the Channel ports. British, Indian and French forces held on to Ypres by the...
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William Charles Cuff

Transcribed by Billy Smith   Great Football Legislator February 7, 1949. The Liverpool Daily Post Mr. W.C. Cuff Dies Mr. William Charles Cuff, president of the Football league, and one of the original members of Everton F.C, died yesterday, aged 80. A Liverpool solicitor, he was one of football’s greatest legislators and was the man who introduced the system of numbering players. The rejection of a plan, a few years ago, for pool betting subsides to football was one of his successes. He consistently opposed this. Mr. Cuff had been president of the Football league from 1939, succeeding Mr. Charles E. Sutcliffe. He was also vice-president of the Football Association and a member of the International Board. His association with the Goodison club was almost lifelong. He joined as a director in 1894 and served Everton as director, chairman, and secretary over fifty years. Last may he resigned from the Board after differences of opinion with his fellow directors. Mr. Cuff was in London last weekend...
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Everton Suspension of 1887

December 12th 1887. The Football Field Chat with Mr. Nisbet How the club came to the front. As all the world knows by this, the Everton F.C. have been adjudged guilty of infringing the laws relating to professionalism and importation, and suspended for a month, the sentence remaining in force until January 5, and thus depriving the club of the benefit of the New Year fixtures. The following seven players have been declared professionals; - Dick, Watson, Izzatt, Murray, Weir, Cassidy, and Goudie. In obedience to our commission, our Everton representative has looked up the courteous secretary of the unfortunate club, and below we are enabled to give the opinions of Mr. Nisbet on the situation.   Well, Mr. Nisbet, I have called this evening to trouble you with a few questions, but before proceeding allow me to express my sympathy with you and the officials, as well as players of the club, in your present difficulties. Now, having got rid of that, can you...
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The Ted Sagar Story

ON BRODSWORTH CINDER PITCHES TED SAGAR LEARNED TO MAKE HIS WONDER SAVES May 14, 1949. The Liverpool Football Echo Twenty Glorious Years By Ted Sagar As Told To Allan Robinson Ted Sagar, Everton’s long-serving international goalkeeper –he is in his 21st year with the club 0begins today the romantic story of his football life, and tells of his early hopes and disappointments and of his first big transfer from one pit team to another which put him on the route to Goodison Park and twenty years of football glory. My age? –it’s no secret I was born in February 1910, which makes me 39. Most top-class footballers hand up their boots before reaching that age but I feel as fit as I did when I first started playing big-time football, and I intend to continue just as long as I can be of service to the best club in the country my first and only love –Everton F.C. maybe my fitness is not unassociated with my...
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Lovers Lane – Thomas Keates

GOODISON PARK November 23, 1912. Evening Express Liverpool. Memories of Everton's Ground. Famous Crickters' Visit. By the Old ‘Un, “Goodison Park eh –a funny park,” said my cousin Bill. He was down from “Brum” for the day, a cheap tripper. He came to see the “Villa” bury “Everton,” but as it fell upon the day the “Villa” were laid low, he attended the funeral. Some people who attend funerals find it difficult to maintain the grave demenou; and mute solemnity appropriate to the sad occasions. Bill had no difficulty. He was genuinely downhearted. His before-the-match gaiety was badly eclipsed by his after-the-match mortification. He hadn't a laugh left in him. When a fellow's team's beaten before his eyes, life's scarcely worth living, is it? Especially when you've come a long way to see the smash-up. We may take the reverses of the team we shout for, and swear by, too sadly, and excite the sneers of the cynic, who has never had the football...
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