A Delve into the Everton Collection – Rob Sawyer

Some of this season’s EFC Heritage Society articles are produced in partnership with the Everton Collection, the unrivalled archive of over 10,000 historical football treasures. In 2007 in order to ensure the archive remained intact for future generations, an initiative was formed with support from the Heritage Lottery Fund, to purchase David France’s memorabilia. Everton FC also gifted its own memorabilia to form The Everton Collection Charitable Trust. The Collection is located at Liverpool Record Office at Liverpool Central Library where it is preserved and conserved in purpose-built archive accommodation meeting the highest standards for long-term preservation and under the care of professional archivists and conservators. The original items can be viewed at Liverpool Record Office by appointment. Items continue to be added – including Joe Mercer’s 1938/39 League Championship medal last year. A crowning glory of the Collection is the series of board minutes ledgers. These ‘Everton Scriptures’ are a series of 29 books documenting, in forensic detail, the inner...
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‘Money Can’t Buy Us Love: Everton in the 1960s’ – By Gavin Buckland – Reviewed by Rob Sawyer

‘Money Can’t Buy Us Love: Everton in the 1960s’ – By Gavin Buckland – Reviewed by Rob Sawyer

Two strong-willed, complicated, men form the axis of a new book by Gavin Buckland which explores, in greater detail than ever before, Everton during the trophy-laden 1960s Rob Sawyer For those who have only been following Everton since the 1990s, you’ll have known the Blues as the plucky underdogs – the Dogs of War, even. It’s been the People’s Club, punching above its weight against opponents with much greater financial clout. For these younger supporters - even in this more financially stable and ambitious Moshiri-led era - it must be hard to envisage a time when the Toffees were the much envied moneybags of British football. Yet, throughout the 1960s, thanks to the ambition of one man, Everton was treated with much of the same suspicion - and grudging admiration - as Chelsea FC was early in the Roman Abramovich era. That man responsible was John Moores, the self-made multi-millionaire from Eccles who made his fortune in the Pools...
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The Charlie Parry Grave Event – 1st March 2019 – Rob Sawyer

An unprepossessing road in the shadow of Goodison Park, is named Salop Street. Salop, or Shropshire as it is more commonly known, might not, at a first glance, be awash with Everton links but that can be misleading. In fact the, largely rural, county has a loyal Blues following (the Shropshire Blues is the local official supporters club branch). Oswestry, 50 miles from Goodison, has several connections links to Everton that go back to the earliest days of the club. George Farmer, a son of the town and a Welsh international footballer, was a key player in the club’s early days and lined up in the Blue’s first ever Football League match in 1888. More recently, one of the Toffees’ greatest players, Alan Ball, spent his formative years in the area when his father, Alan Ball Senior, was managing Oswestry Town FC. But, it was to mark the life of another former player that EFC Heritage Society came to...
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Frank Sugg – A Great Sporting All-Rounder – Rob Sawyer

As a child, a shopping trip to nearby Stockport was not complete without a visit to the Sugg Sport emporium in the Merseyway Shopping Centre. Back then I was blissfully unaware of the link between the family giving its name to the Yorkshire-based retail chain and Everton FC. Frank Howe Sugg, like Jack Sharp and Harry Makepeace, was a notable footballer-cum-cricketer on Everton’s books. Born in Ilkeston, in 1862, Frank was raised in Pitsmoor, Sheffield from the age of four, along with his elder brother, Walter. The boys’ parents had designs on them following their father, Hubert, into the legal profession but, distracted by playing sport, they never became fully-qualified (although the knowledge acquired would prove useful in their business ventures). At six-foot tall and of stocky build, Frank was a big-hitting batsman who racked up 16 centuries in a seventeen-year career with Yorkshire, Derbyshire and, principally, Lancashire. He was selected for two England test appearances against Australia in 1888. Although cricket...
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