Keys and Warmby — The Duo from Derby

In preparation for life in the Football League, Everton Football Club made several new signings during the summer of 1888. Two of them, Keys and Warmby, had joined them from Derby County. Despite the fact that the local newspapers make no reference to their background, they were in fact related by marriage and had reached the Mersey Seaport by two slightly different routes. William Henry Warmby was born, 1863, in South Yorkshire where he began his football career with his local team, Rotherham Town. Sometime around 1883 he moved to Derby where he took up a job as an engine fitter (Midland Railway?) and played his football with a team made up of players from the congregation at the church of St Luke. They were one of the lesser known teams in the town and played on a small ground at Peat Street. On November 8th, 1884 they travelled to face Wolverhampton Wanderers in an FA Cup tie, on their home...
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Jack Cock – Scorer, Singer, Soldier, Superstar

EVERTON HISTORY Jack Cock – Scorer, Singer, Soldier, Superstar ROB SAWYER (EFC HERITAGE SOCIETY) 18/11/2016 Relatively few Cornishmen have represented Everton but several have left their mark on Merseyside. Mike Trebilcock carved his name into FA Cup folk-lore whilst Nigel Martyn established himself as the finest Goodison goal-keeper since Neville Southall. However, the most remarkable life story is that of Jack Cock: international footballer, team manager, war hero and star of stage and screen. John Gilbert “Jack” Cock, the third child of James (an iron-trimmer) and Eliza, entered the world on 15 November 1893 in the Cornish village of Phillack, close to the port town of Hayle. By the time Jack was seven James had relocated the family from this bucolic setting to Fulham in West London. Jack would earn pocket money selling chocolates to spectators inside Craven Cottage and dream of becoming a footballer. Such hopes faded when James' work took the family to the footballing backwater of Camborne in Cornwall. Nevertheless Jack...
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In Search of John Houlding-by Tony Onslow

This article is not intended to either praise or condemn John Houlding for the role he played in the decision, made by Everton Football Club, to move away from Anfield. It is merely an effort to try and throw some light on this “larger than life character” who played a big part in the establishing the game of Association Football in his home town of Liverpool.   Local records reveal that John Houlding was baptised, 4-08-1833, at St Martin-in the-Field church and that he was the second of three sons born to Thomas Houlding, a Cow keeper, and his wife Alice. The family reside at 19 Tenderden Street where the income from Thomas Houlding’s occupation enables him to provide his children with a good standard of education and a comfortable home in which to live.   The 1851 census reveal that John Houlding is still living in Tenderden Street where, along with his younger brother William, he lists his occupation as “Auditing at home”....
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Why Leicester Fosse? – by Tony Onslow

History will be made today when the present Premier League champions take to the field for what is their first ever FA Cup tie at Goodison Park. The visitors were formed in 1884 by a group of young men from a local evangelical chapel who decided to form a football team that they chose to call Leicester Fosse. This suffix was chosen because the old Roman Road, known as the Fosseway, had once passed through the area and a military encampment was “set up” to protect it from attack near to the spot where it forded the River Soar. The group then all agreed to pay nine old pence membership fee and another nine pence was collected to purchase a football. They then played at several different locations before a certain Miss Westland, as local folklore has it, suggested they constructed an enclosure at a site known on Walnut Street which, in turn, became Filbert Street.   Leicester Fosse Football Club...
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