The Life and Times of Frank Brettell

The name of Francis Edward Brettell first appears on the Liverpool census in 1871 when he is reported as living at No 5 house, Court 13, on Boundary Street. His Father, William Brettell, lists his occupation as that of a Nut and Bold Maker and gives his birthplace as West Bromwich in Staffordshire. His wife Harriet, the mother of Frank, has been born in Devonshire. Frank, who is 9 years old, is the eldest of her three children and he has been born at Smethwick in Staffordshire. The premature death of Harriet, in 1881, saw Frank, along with rest of the family, move in with his father’s brother at 62 Aughton Street off Netherfield Road. It was around this time that he was first reported to be playing football for Everton. The match, against Birkenhead, took place on St Anne’s field where Everton lost by 2 goals to 0. The date was January, 1880. Frank Brettell became a regular feature of the...
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The Men Who Bankrolled Everton

The original History of the Everton Football Club, by Thomas Keates, published in 1928, tells us that James Clement Baxter, who was reported to have loaned them £1,000, was the man credited with financing their move away from Anfield and over to Goodison Park. This alas, according the Liverpool newspapers, does not appear to be the case. The good Doctor did indeed make a generous donation to aid their departure but he was not alone in doing so. Several other people, some prominent local businessmen amongst them, were also credited with giving the club their support. These individuals, not all of them Everton football fans, had various reasons for doing so and their names first became known at a meeting that was held on 15 March 1892, at the Royal Street Presbyterian School in Liverpool. Mr George Mahon, who took the chair, described: …that he had in his hand a guarantee fund which contained the names of Gentleman from in and outside...
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The ‘Lost Home’ of Everton Football Club

The date is 27 October 1883 and a Liverpool-based journalist has set out to cover a game of football that is to take place on a new enclosure that had recently been completed by the executive of Everton Football Club. The need for this location had arisen because the number of people that were now assembling to watch them play had become too large to control at their previous home on Stanley Park. The spectators, around 2,000 in number, were swarming around the unguarded touchlines, spilling onto the pitch and disrupting the play. These fortunate bands of football followers were also enjoying their entertainment free of charge. If the Everton club were going to move forward, then their followers would have to prove their loyalty by being prepared to pay for the privilege of watching them play football on an enclosed ground. Such a location was now ready for occupation and it opened, officially, with a representative match between the Liverpool &...
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A Christmas Tale from Liverpool

The retail stores of Liverpool had filled their windows with Christmas gifts to remind their potential customers that the festive season was near when a twenty-year-old Scotsman arrived at Tithebarn Railway Station to be greeted by the representatives of Everton Football Club. The weary traveller was John William Angus and he had been spotted while playing football in Glasgow by a talent scout who dispatched him down Liverpool where he was to spend a trail period at Anfield. The Scot would have then been taken, by the club conveyance, to meet the lady with whom he would lodge (usually a Mrs Evans on Chepstow Street) before being taken on to meet the Everton captain, Nick Ross. Anfield, shortly before the departure of Everton. Jack Angus was born on 1st December, 1868, in an area of central Glasgow long since given over to commerce, known as Bythswood. He first came to prominense when playing for a local junior club, Kelvingrove Athletic, against Queens...
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