Andrew Gibson, The Blue from Dalmellington

Although destined never to play a Football League match for the club, Andrew Gibson played a leading role in the years leading up to Everton becoming founder members of the new organisation.  He had been at the club for two seasons when the above picture was taken and he had travelled a somewhat roundabout route to reach the town where he would spend the rest of his days. Andrew Gibson was born on 31st January, 1864, at the number 3 house in the High Main Street of the Ayrshire market town of Dalmellington. His Father and Grandfather, both named Alexander, belonged to the accident order of Fleshers (qualified slaughter men) thus making the family prominent members of the local community. The 1881 census lets us know that Andrew, now 17, had moved to the town of Kilmarnock which was expanding due to the fact that it is now the headquarters of Glasgow and South Western Railway Company. He was living with relatives...
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In Search of John Houlding-by Tony Onslow

This article is not intended to either praise or condemn John Houlding for the role he played in the decision, made by Everton Football Club, to move away from Anfield. It is merely an effort to try and throw some light on this “larger than life character” who played a big part in the establishing the game of Association Football in his home town of Liverpool.   Local records reveal that John Houlding was baptised, 4-08-1833, at St Martin-in the-Field church and that he was the second of three sons born to Thomas Houlding, a Cow keeper, and his wife Alice. The family reside at 19 Tenderden Street where the income from Thomas Houlding’s occupation enables him to provide his children with a good standard of education and a comfortable home in which to live.   The 1851 census reveal that John Houlding is still living in Tenderden Street where, along with his younger brother William, he lists his occupation as “Auditing at home”....
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Andrew Gibson, The Blue from Dalmellington.- by Tony Onslow

  Although destined never to play a Football League match for the club Andrew Gibson played a leading role in the years leading up to Everton becoming founder members of the new organisation. He had been at the club for two seasons when the above picture was taken and he had travelled a somewhat roundabout route to reach to reach the town where he would spend the rest of his days. Andrew Gibson was born,31-1-1864, at number 3 house in the High Main Street of the Ayrshire market town of Dalmellington. His Father and Grandfather, both named Alexander, belonged to the accident order of Fleshers (Qualified Slaughter Men) thus making the family prominent members of the local community. The 1881 census lets us know that Andrew, now 17, has moved to the town of Kilmarnock which was expanding due to the fact that it is now the headquarters of Glasgow and South Western Railway Company. He is living with relatives, at 22, West...
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The Merseyside Derby Game. – by Tony Onslow

  The people of the Merseyside “turn in on themselves” today as their two vintage football clubs line up to face each other for the 194th time. No other City in England can claim to have staged more local Derby games, at the top level of English football, than Liverpool. The atmosphere will be electric yet when these two deadly rivals first locked horns with each other it was on a football pitch that has long since faded in to local folklore. The date was April 1893 and the occasion was the final of Liverpool Senior Cup which took place, in front of 10,000 people, on the present home of Bootle Cricket Club at Wadham Road. The encounter was settled by a single goal, that was scored, in favour of Liverpool, by Scotsman Tom Wylie who had once played for Everton but, following the acrimonious “split” had chosen to remain at Anfield. His new club nevertheless, were members of the Lancashire League...
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With Everton at Great Lever by Tony Onslow

There has long been some confusion concerning the outcome of the first competitive game, played by Everton, that was won, eventually, by their opponents Great Lever. Early local historians state that Everton drew the tie, 1-1, and then were decisively beaten, in the replay, by 8 goals to 1, on Stanley Park. However, the record books of the Lancashire FA, held in Leyland, prove that Great Lever did indeed venture in to next round of the competition but the re-play, which was rather acrimonious, took place in their home town of Bolton.   The parishioners of St Bartholomew’s church had formed a football club in 1877 before making their headquarters, one year later, at a local tavern that was called the Old Robin Hood. Here they changed their name to Great Lever and set about constructing a simple enclosure that was adjacent to a notorious local land mark called Wellington Yard, which by its description, appeared to be a Tannery. The club...
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