When Parker Tamed Tigers by Dave Prentice

    Run through the list of Everton’s record scorers against almost every club we’ve ever faced and one name predictably dominates. William Ralph Dean. Everton’s top scorer against Arsenal? Dixie with 12 goals. Liverpool? Dixie with 19. Chelsea? Dixie again with 10. But not today’s visitors Hull City. The man who tormented the Tigers even more than the celebrated Dixie throughout his career was another Everton striker, a man who doesn’t feature as frequently whenever lists of Everton’s great forwards are mentioned but whose goals return was impressive. John Willie Parker was described as a “stylish inside- forward” who played much of his football for Everton during the brief spell we spent outside the top flight between 1951 and 1954. He scored 89 goals in his 176 Everton appearances, many of them in that spell – and in the promotion campaign of 1953/54 top-scored with 31 goals in 38 starts. He scored once against Hull that season, but it was in Everton’s first campaign of Second Division football...
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Phew, 9-1 win is a scorcher by David Prentice

                  Cartoon “Referees and the Heat Wave. Suggested Outfit”; headline from the Liverpool Daily Post & Mercury –   “Football Hot O! Players Collapse”; a cartoon from the Football Echo of Saturday 8 September, reflecting on the heatwave. Caption reads: ‘Overheard last Saturday: “Tommy, come and stand in the shade; it’s cooler.” The start of September 1906 saw England sweltering in a heatwave – the most intense temperatures recorded in the 20th century. It was weather for sunbathing, not sport, as the temperatures topped 32 degrees for four successive days throughout most of the country. No surprise, then, that the Liverpool Daily Post & Mercury’s headline for Monday 3 September read: Football Hot O! A Warm Kick- Off And Enormous Crowds. Players Collapse. While the editorial began: “The Glorious First, which duly celebrates the commencement of two distinct classes of sport – football and partridge shooting – will long be remembered for its overpowering heat.” Maybe the heat helped explain the events at Goodison Park on  the  Monday evening of 3...
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Spreading the Everton name…by John Shearon

At the final whistle of this evening’s game both sets of players will be looking forward to a well-earned  rest over the coming months.   In late April 1909, this was not the case as Everton closed the season with a 4-2 win over Leicester Fosse to finish runners-up to champions Newcastle United. The Toffees, along with Spurs, who likewise had finished runners-up but in the Second Division, had been invited to play a number of friendly matches in Argentina and Uruguay where the sport was still in its infancy. This was not the first such tour. Southampton in 1904 and Nottingham Forest in 1905 had made earlier visits, but it would result in the first match between two professional teams in the Americas (until professionalism was first introduced to Argentina in 1931), and would leave a lasting impression in South America. Everton left Lime Street on 13 May 1909, boarding the Argentine-bound R.M.S. Aruguaya in Southampton the following day. Spurs literally missed the...
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The Influence Of Tom… by James Corbett

The Influence Of Tom...by James Corbett 16 March 1925, after months of scouting, negotiation and gentle persuasion, Everton’s secretary- manager Tom M c Int osh concluded the most important transfer deal in the Club’s history. For £3,000, William Ralph (‘Dixie’) Dean arrived from Tranmere Rovers. Three years later, Dean’s record 60-goal tally propelled Everton back to the summit of English football. Today, Dean resides amongst the football immortals, yet McIntosh, who served as Everton’s secretary-manager for 15 years, is little remembered. That is a shame, for as well as being a key figure in the signing of Dean, he helped the Club move from a state of post-War transition into a golden era. Like several of the men who followed him into the Everton manager’s office – Harry Catterick, Gordon Lee and Howard  Kendall – McIntosh was a North-Easterner, born in Sedgefield in 1879. A teenage player with Darlington in the 1890s, he reverted to the role of club secretary in 1902. Nine years later...
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Sponsorship deals in the early 1900s ‘Everton by Postcard’

Sponsorship deals in the early 1900s ‘Everton by Postcard’ By Brendan Connolly In the early 1900s, postcards were the equivalent of current day text messages. Very few people had telephones, so the postal system was the main method of communication. As a result, demand dictated that there were four mail deliveries per day, with the last post being late in the evening. It was not unusual to post a letter or postcard early in the morning and receive a reply the same day. Postcards carried a lower postal rate than letters and by the early 1900s picture postcards had become very popular and companies seized the opportunity to use them to advertise. Morris Evans Household Oils were based in Festiniog, North Wales and put their name to a postcard illustrating our 1906 FA Cup-winning team. The company claimed that their products were a remedy for rheumatism, sciatica, lumbago and sore throats. They also prided themselves on how effective their oils were for dogs and farm...
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Mo Joins Fanatics KitAid Box-Up with Society c/o Everton Website

  @Everton 25 February 2017 13:36 Share Everton midfielder Muhamed Besic was on hand at Everton’s People’s Hub last week to help ‘box-up’ more than 400 shirts being donated to charity by the Club’s retail partner, Fanatics. Earlier in the season Fanatics were made aware of the long-standing partnership Everton in the Community have with the national charity KitAid and it was then they decided to make the generous contribution. The shirts being donated are those that were given back by fans after a number of players changed their squad numbers ahead of the 2016/17 season, including Besic. By giving them to KitAid, the retail outlet are ensuring that they will be distributed to some of the most under-privileged children and adults in some of the world’s poorest countries. During the activity, Besic, who joined the Club in 2014, also met with representatives from the Club’s official charity, KitAid and Fanatics as well as members of The Everton Heritage Society - who collect for KitAid at St...
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Whitechapel Donations

  Paul kelly is pictured above at the Whitechapel centre when we delivered the winter wear and toiletries donated by staff at Everton Football club , Everton in the community, staff at Essar oil  Stanlow  and Everton Heritage. Society 'the Society have been collecting since the turn of the year with winter clothing and toiletries culminating in 5 large boxes and 12 bin bags being delivered today.   Everton former players Ronny Goodlass and Pat van den Hauwe have also supported kitaid and the Whitechapel centre with personal donations. It was quite humbling taking the photo of our treasurer and the regular visitors to the Whitechapel centre as they had finished their lunch and the smiles on their faces when they received Everton coats and sweatshirts was a site for sore eyes.   Thank you for donations for Both KitAid and the Whitechapel Keep them coming...
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Deulofeu and Barkley shirts land in South Africa

  KitAid at St Luke’s Our latest boxing session took place today had 70 boxes (2275 items) kit are on their way to Africa, especially Malawi and South Africa. Ourselves Here at Essar, the heritage society Everton Fc, EiTC, Everton supporters and Fanatics along with have been fantastic supporting kitaid and also with the winter training gear going to the Whitechapel centre for the homeless. EiTc's Carena Duffy gathered her team of volunteers to support the heritage team of Paul Kelly, Ali and Peter Jones along with Richie Gillham who were marshalled by Derrick Williams head of kitaid, Janet Neville and her local team Boxes and boxes of Everton kit from Everton Supporters and fanatics were sorted into teas of 13 and boxed away.          ...
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Kitaid

  KitAid is a small charity with a big heart! Run entirely by volunteers, it was founded in 1998 by Derrick Williams MBE. During a trip to a village in Tanzania Derrick, a passionate football fan, spotted young children playing in tattered shirts and a ball made of plastic bags. On his return he collected a box of kit and sent it back to the village and KitAid was born. Since then we have sent more than 275,000 items of kit around the world, reaching over 40 countries across 5 continents. KitAid is very proud to have Graham Taylor as its patron.   KitAid now has Regional Co-ordinators around the country collecting kits, boots and equipment from Grass Roots level to the Premiership. We also receive kit from major suppliers including new kit that cannot be resold in the UK which would otherwise end up in landfill, recycling approximately 15 tonnes of unwanted kit annually.   Every month KitAid volunteers collect, sort and...
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Harry Williams – Death of a Mascot by Rob Sawyer

Aside from the iconic Toffee Lady, Everton supporters in the 1930s also possessed two unofficial mascots. Harry Williams of Westminster Road, Kirkdale, and his near neighbour, William Jones, would “play up” for Blues fans both home and away. Williams would wear his trademark mock policeman’s uniform, decorated with the club colours whilst Jones would don a blue and white chess-board suit. In the days before fences and enclosures, the firm friends were often permitted to “conduct” the crowds from the cinder path bordering the pitch. When Everton travelled to St Andrew’s on 11 February 1939 for a FA Cup 5th round fixture against Birmingham City – the “blues brothers” were determined to entertain fellow fans and be entertained by the champions-elect. Press photographers captured Harry Williams in his trademark bobby outfit (with the number 9 emblazoned on the lapels) but, sadly, tragedy would strike. The Liverpool Evening Express described how 44-year-old Williams was walking with a crowd towards the stadium when...
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