Harry Williams – Death of a Mascot by Rob Sawyer

Aside from the iconic Toffee Lady, Everton supporters in the 1930s also possessed two unofficial mascots. Harry Williams of Westminster Road, Kirkdale, and his near neighbour, William Jones, would “play up” for Blues fans both home and away. Williams would wear his trademark mock policeman’s uniform, decorated with the club colours whilst Jones would don a blue and white chess-board suit. In the days before fences and enclosures, the firm friends were often permitted to “conduct” the crowds from the cinder path bordering the pitch. When Everton travelled to St Andrew’s on 11 February 1939 for a FA Cup 5th round fixture against Birmingham City – the “blues brothers” were determined to entertain fellow fans and be entertained by the champions-elect. Press photographers captured Harry Williams in his trademark bobby outfit (with the number 9 emblazoned on the lapels) but, sadly, tragedy would strike. The Liverpool Evening Express described how 44-year-old Williams was walking with a crowd towards the stadium when...
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66 hero gets his 63 championship medal at last

66 hero gets his 63 championship medal at last

Everton legend Derek Temple was finally been presented with a League title medal, 53 years after helping the Blues lift the trophy. Temple had played in five games for Everton in the Championship winning side of 1963 but at the time that wasn’t enough to be presented with a title winner’s medal. However, in the years since then, things have changed and today Leicester’s Mark Schwarzer will collect his second successive title medal despite having not played for either of his clubs. So, The Everton Heritage Society set about the task of asking The FA to make sure Temple was rewarded for his part in Everton’s title winning season in the 60’s and last night, at a gala dinner to celebrate the 50th anniversary of his winning goal at Wembley in the FA Cup final, he was presented with his medal. Dr David France proudly handed Derek his medal in a packed Devonshire House Hotel, surrounded by Everton legends including Mike Trebilcock who had...
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Everton Proud – David France

  http://www.decoubertin.co.uk/everton-proud/ 'Dr Everton is more than a football fan. 'Everton Proud' - also known as Everton Crazy - is more than a football book. Both are truly inspirational.' Alex Young 'There's obsession, then there's David France's love for Everton. This autobiography is the fascinating tale of a Blue who struggled to read until his teens yet became not only a hugely successful US Businessman but an an innovator and philanthropist who deserves our everlasting gratitude.' Andy Hunter, the Guardian 'After reading this terrific book, I realise that mine isn't the only life he has changed.' Tony Kay 'The titles of David France's books contain words such as obsession and crazy. Of course, these are synonyms for love.' Michael Walker, The Irish Times. NOTE: 'Everton Proud' by Dr David France is the extended version of 'Everton Crazy'. With two new extra chapters and new illustrations to go with it, 'Everton Proud' tells the extraordinary life of David and his love affair with the club.  ONLY LIMITED COPIES AVAILABLE.  All Blues are aware...
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Support KitAid at Goodison

Support KitAid at Goodison Latest news 01 December Everton in the Community launch The new partnership was officially launched at the home game against Swansea City on 19 November and this was preceded by a really good article on the club website which involved a player (Bryan Oviedo) promoting the appeal by holding up an Everton shirt with KitAid on the back. Collections were held at different locations around Goodison and once again we are very grateful to our friends from the Everton Heritage Society who helped to promote and collect kit for us. Our relationship with Everton will continue to grow and EITC have promised to keep our partnership alive by helping to promote KitAid to their fan base. We also agreed to hold another kit collection day at the game versus Watford next May. All in all, a really great new partnership for KitAid and we are grateful for all of the support we have received in getting this set up. Everton in the Community has...
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In Search of John Houlding-by Tony Onslow

This article is not intended to either praise or condemn John Houlding for the role he played in the decision, made by Everton Football Club, to move away from Anfield. It is merely an effort to try and throw some light on this “larger than life character” who played a big part in the establishing the game of Association Football in his home town of Liverpool.   Local records reveal that John Houlding was baptised, 4-08-1833, at St Martin-in the-Field church and that he was the second of three sons born to Thomas Houlding, a Cow keeper, and his wife Alice. The family reside at 19 Tenderden Street where the income from Thomas Houlding’s occupation enables him to provide his children with a good standard of education and a comfortable home in which to live.   The 1851 census reveal that John Houlding is still living in Tenderden Street where, along with his younger brother William, he lists his occupation as “Auditing at home”....
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