Andrew Gibson, The Blue from Dalmellington

Although destined never to play a Football League match for the club, Andrew Gibson played a leading role in the years leading up to Everton becoming founder members of the new organisation.  He had been at the club for two seasons when the above picture was taken and he had travelled a somewhat roundabout route to reach the town where he would spend the rest of his days. Andrew Gibson was born on 31st January, 1864, at the number 3 house in the High Main Street of the Ayrshire market town of Dalmellington. His Father and Grandfather, both named Alexander, belonged to the accident order of Fleshers (qualified slaughter men) thus making the family prominent members of the local community. The 1881 census lets us know that Andrew, now 17, had moved to the town of Kilmarnock which was expanding due to the fact that it is now the headquarters of Glasgow and South Western Railway Company. He was living with relatives...
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Keys and Warmby — The Duo from Derby

In preparation for life in the Football League, Everton Football Club made several new signings during the summer of 1888. Two of them, Keys and Warmby, had joined them from Derby County. Despite the fact that the local newspapers make no reference to their background, they were in fact related by marriage and had reached the Mersey Seaport by two slightly different routes. William Henry Warmby was born, 1863, in South Yorkshire where he began his football career with his local team, Rotherham Town. Sometime around 1883 he moved to Derby where he took up a job as an engine fitter (Midland Railway?) and played his football with a team made up of players from the congregation at the church of St Luke. They were one of the lesser known teams in the town and played on a small ground at Peat Street. On November 8th, 1884 they travelled to face Wolverhampton Wanderers in an FA Cup tie, on their home...
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In Search of John Houlding-by Tony Onslow

This article is not intended to either praise or condemn John Houlding for the role he played in the decision, made by Everton Football Club, to move away from Anfield. It is merely an effort to try and throw some light on this “larger than life character” who played a big part in the establishing the game of Association Football in his home town of Liverpool.   Local records reveal that John Houlding was baptised, 4-08-1833, at St Martin-in the-Field church and that he was the second of three sons born to Thomas Houlding, a Cow keeper, and his wife Alice. The family reside at 19 Tenderden Street where the income from Thomas Houlding’s occupation enables him to provide his children with a good standard of education and a comfortable home in which to live.   The 1851 census reveal that John Houlding is still living in Tenderden Street where, along with his younger brother William, he lists his occupation as “Auditing at home”....
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Lovers Lane – Thomas Keates

GOODISON PARK November 23, 1912. Evening Express Liverpool. Memories of Everton's Ground. Famous Crickters' Visit. By the Old ‘Un, “Goodison Park eh –a funny park,” said my cousin Bill. He was down from “Brum” for the day, a cheap tripper. He came to see the “Villa” bury “Everton,” but as it fell upon the day the “Villa” were laid low, he attended the funeral. Some people who attend funerals find it difficult to maintain the grave demenou; and mute solemnity appropriate to the sad occasions. Bill had no difficulty. He was genuinely downhearted. His before-the-match gaiety was badly eclipsed by his after-the-match mortification. He hadn't a laugh left in him. When a fellow's team's beaten before his eyes, life's scarcely worth living, is it? Especially when you've come a long way to see the smash-up. We may take the reverses of the team we shout for, and swear by, too sadly, and excite the sneers of the cynic, who has never had the football...
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