ST Lukes The church with its own Football Ground

  ST LUKE’S – THE CHURCH WITH ITS OWN FOOTBALL STADIUM! Although Everton F.C. started life as the St Domingo’s church team in 1878, it is now closely associated with another place of worship. St. Luke the Evangelist, nestled between the Main and Howard Kendall Gwladys Street Stands, contributes to The uniqueness of The Old Lady. But why does the stadium have a church in such an unlikely spot? A wooden Church of England mission hall predated Goodison Park by at least nine years. Therefore, since its opening in 1892 the stadium has had to grow around this sacred spot. In 1899, the first Bishop of Liverpool laid the foundation stone of a parish church to replace the wooden building. The architect, James Francis Doyle, was known for the White Star and Royal Insurance buildings in the city centre. His original designs for  St St Luke’s included a tower and spire but these were rationalised. Construction of the adjacent parish hall commenced in 1908.  A...
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BRITTON’S BLUES

In September 1948, Cliff Britton completed the short journey from Turf Moor to Goodison Park to become Everton manager. In so doing, he became the first former player to hold the position and his appointment offered hope for the future. At Burnley he was considered one of the most promising managers in England, leading the Clarets To promotion from the Second Division, an FA Cup final and third place in the top flight in successive years. Britton was a favourite son of Goodison, having enjoyed a distinguished playing career as half-back. He was, recorded a 1936 profile, ‘One of the most gentlemanly and unassuming players in the game. An artiste in ball control and delightful to watch. Revels in linking up with the forwards, whilst his accurate lobbed centres are ever a menace.’ Britton had clear ideas of how he should manage Everton. In agreeing to take charge he laid down precise terms of employment to which the board agreed. These included: ‘Full power over...
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T G Jones at 100

T.G. Jones at 100 Posted by Rob Sawyer on October 12, 2017 12 October 2017 marks the centenary of the birth of Thomas George Ronald Jones in Queensferry, Flintshire. The tall, quiet son of a Connah’s Quay coal merchant would find his footballing feet at Wrexham F.C. but he would achieve immortality at Goodison Park. His first two initials, T.G. became synonymous with the art of cultured defensive play. In March 1936 the footballing eye of Toffees director Jack Sharp - himself a playing great – recognised the promise in the leggy teenage centre-half. In no time T.G. had swapped The Racecourse Ground for Goodison but the callow youth initially struggled on Merseyside. Only upon returning to live just across the Welsh border did he settle and secure his place in the Everton first eleven, at the expense of Charlie Gee. Goodison Park had never seen anything quite like T.G. – here was a centre-half who could deal with the physicality of rough-house centre-forwards...
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Everton’s First League Cup Semi-Final – Steve Zocek

In January 1977 Everton were only two matches away from their first Wembley final in the 17-year existence of the League Cup. Bolton Wanderers of the Second Division side stood between them and the Twin Towers. Everton had parted company with manager Billy Bingham just ten days before the first leg. With the search underway for Bingham’s successor – Bobby Robson being the original preferred choice - Steve Burtenshaw took charge in a caretaker capacity. Everton’s path to the semi-final commenced on August Bank Holiday Monday with a comfortable 3-0 defeat of Cambridge United. A solitary Bob Latchford goal was enough to ease past Stockport County at Edgeley Park in the next round, after which a home defeat of Coventry City set up a quarter final tie with Manchester United. Everton silenced the 57,738 Old Trafford crowd, crushing the hosts 3-0. The Blues hosted the Trotters in the first semi-final leg with 54,032 fans inside echoing, “Tell me ma, me ma; I don’t want no tea,...
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In Search of the First Everton Stalwart

Rain was falling heavily as I left the train at New Brighton Railway Station in search of a former Everton captain who, I had discovered, was buried in Wallasey at Rake Lane cemetery. The person, whose last resting place I was searching for, was George Dobson. I knew he had died in 1941 but, as I had no grave number, I searched for over an hour without success before, wet through, I started to head for home. However, as I passed through the main gate, I noticed the resident stonemasons’ office and knocked at the door. My luck was in. I was greeted by a man whose name, I later learned, was Alan and he turned out to be an Everton season ticket holder. I told him why I was here, what I was looking for, and he did all in his power to assist. Having found the information I required he then took me, by car, to area where George...
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The Man Who Coached Everton to Their First League Title

It is the summer of 1891 and the players of Everton Football Club proudly pose with Football League championship trophy which they recently won for the first time. The club executives, who were in charge of team selection, must take much of the credit for this triumph because of their clever dealings in the transfer market. The extra players they had brought in had proved to be good enough to carry of the championship after finishing second in the previous season. Their fitness and welfare however, they had placed in the hands of a former Everton player who, in the absence of a club manager, was virtually in charge of operations outside of the boardroom. His name was David Waugh and he stands, in mufti, in the top right hand corner of this picture. Waugh was born the son of factory worker in the Stirlingshire town of Larbert in the year of 1861 before the family moved to Glasgow some time...
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Andrew Hannah

By being the first man to captain both Everton Football Club and their local rivals Liverpool, Andrew Hannah holds a unique position in Merseyside folklore. He was born of Irish parentage on 17 September 1864, at Renton, Dunbartonshire where his father, Henry, was running a grocery shop. The premises stood at 72 Main Street where he was assisted by his wife, Margaret. The couple had one other son. Hannah started his football career playing at full back with the Renton club and was in the side that beat Vale of Leven, by 3 goals to 1, in the 1885 Scottish FA Cup Final. He was also in the Renton side when they lifted the trophy for a second time in 1888 with a 6-1 win over Cambuslang. On 3 March that year, he won his only international cap when he represented Scotland in a 5-1 win over Wales at Easter Road in Edinburgh. On 27 April 1888, Andrew Hannah married Jessie Thompson at...
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The Tale of a Former Everton Full Back

  George Molyneux was on the books of Southampton when he was selected for England, against Scotland, and thus became the first Liverpool born man, having previously played football for Everton, to do so. The 1881 census tells us that George, who was then 6 years old, is living, along with his parents, at 29 Sessions Road in the Kirkdale area of the City. The 1901 census then reveals that the family had moved to nearby Croyland Street and that George, now 15 years old, had begun serving an apprenticeship as a Plumber. It is around three years later his name starts to appear in the local sporting press while playing football for his local amateur side, Kirkdale. On the 9th of September 1895 Molyneux was selected to represent the Liverpool & District side, against the Everton Combination XI, on the home of the St Elphins club in Warrington. After the game he was invited for a trail match with his...
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Ted Critchley – My Dad

Rob Sawyer in Conversation with Doris Holmes (née Critchley) Ted Critchley was the Trevor Steven, Dave Thomas or Alex Scott of his day: fast and skilful with an unerring ability to dribble and deliver crosses into the box from the right flank.Ted made his name as an outside-right with hometown club, Stockport County, whom he joined as a 17-year-old in 1922 after impressing in local football. His 188 games for The Hatters, including a few alongside Harry Catterick Senior, saw him play Second Division football and collect a Manchester Senior Cup winner's medal. Everton, on the look-out for a replacement for Sam Chedgzoy, came calling in December 1926 — albeit after some procrastination. Ted turned out to be an astute signing as he and Alec Troup marauded down the flanks to help “Dixie” reach his glorious 60 in 1928. Famed for his pace, Ted would later joke: “Let’s put it this way – I could run half-an-hour in 25 minutes!” In his 8-year...
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Charlie Gee: Stockport, Everton and England

Charlie Gee’s story is one of a remarkable rise from Stockport church football to Everton and  England honours.  In three consecutive seasons he played Third, Second and First Division football – culminating in a 1932 league championship medal. Charlie also holds the key to the Everton career of one of the most important men in the Toffees’ illustrious history – Harry Catterick. Charles William Gee was born on 6 April 1909 in the Reddish district of Stockport. He was one of eight children born to Edward and Jane Gee. Edward was a sweet shop owner who, as a side-line, also operated as a bookmaker from his cellar Charlie’s elder brother Ted was reputed to the best footballer in the family but broke his leg in a fall when working on a roof. Like Ted, Charlie trained to be a joiner but was a passionate about sport – adept at cricket, swimming and football. Appearances as right-back and captain of the North Reddish...
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