Bob Latchford’s 30 goal season

Bob Latchford’s 30 goal season

"Bobby Latchford walks on water", echoed the cry from the Goodison terraces as they idolised their Everton number nine. Everton were renowned for their famous number nines and Bob was no different. The Daily Express newspaper decided to offer a prize of £10,000 for a player to hit the back of the net thirty times in the 1977/78 season. The last time this feat had been achieved was back in 1972 when Francis Lee hit thirty three goals for Manchester City. Manager Billy Bingham signed Bob in 1974, for what was then a massive record signing fee of £350,000, with two players going the other way to Birmingham City. Bob was described as a sprinter who could outmuscle his way through opponents, and was deadly in the six yard box. Big Bob registered his first league goal that season at Leicester City’s Filbert Street on September 10th as Everton were in rampant mood hitting The Foxes for five. With Everton's first attack of...
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St Luke’s – the church with its own football ground

  ST LUKE’S – THE CHURCH WITH ITS OWN FOOTBALL STADIUM! Although Everton F.C. started life as the St Domingo’s church team in 1878, it is now closely associated with another place of worship. St. Luke the Evangelist, nestled between the Main and Howard Kendall Gwladys Street Stands, contributes to The uniqueness of The Old Lady. But why does the stadium have a church in such an unlikely spot? A wooden Church of England mission hall predated Goodison Park by at least nine years. Therefore, since its opening in 1892 the stadium has had to grow around this sacred spot. In 1899, the first Bishop of Liverpool laid the foundation stone of a parish church to replace the wooden building. The architect, James Francis Doyle, was known for the White Star and Royal Insurance buildings in the city centre. His original designs for  St St Luke’s included a tower and spire but these were rationalised. Construction of the adjacent parish hall commenced in 1908.  A...
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Britton’s Blues

In September 1948, Cliff Britton completed the short journey from Turf Moor to Goodison Park to become Everton manager. In so doing, he became the first former player to hold the position and his appointment offered hope for the future. At Burnley he was considered one of the most promising managers in England, leading the Clarets To promotion from the Second Division, an FA Cup final and third place in the top flight in successive years. Britton was a favourite son of Goodison, having enjoyed a distinguished playing career as half-back. He was, recorded a 1936 profile, ‘One of the most gentlemanly and unassuming players in the game. An artiste in ball control and delightful to watch. Revels in linking up with the forwards, whilst his accurate lobbed centres are ever a menace.’ Britton had clear ideas of how he should manage Everton. In agreeing to take charge he laid down precise terms of employment to which the board agreed. These included: ‘Full power over...
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T.G. Jones at 100

T.G. Jones at 100 Posted by Rob Sawyer on October 12, 2017 12 October 2017 marks the centenary of the birth of Thomas George Ronald Jones in Queensferry, Flintshire. The tall, quiet son of a Connah’s Quay coal merchant would find his footballing feet at Wrexham F.C. but he would achieve immortality at Goodison Park. His first two initials, T.G. became synonymous with the art of cultured defensive play. In March 1936 the footballing eye of Toffees director Jack Sharp - himself a playing great – recognised the promise in the leggy teenage centre-half. In no time T.G. had swapped The Racecourse Ground for Goodison but the callow youth initially struggled on Merseyside. Only upon returning to live just across the Welsh border did he settle and secure his place in the Everton first eleven, at the expense of Charlie Gee. Goodison Park had never seen anything quite like T.G. – here was a centre-half who could deal with the physicality of rough-house centre-forwards...
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