A Christmas Tale from Liverpool

The retail stores of Liverpool had filled their windows with Christmas gifts to remind their potential customers that the festive season was near when a twenty-year-old Scotsman arrived at Tithebarn Railway Station to be greeted by the representatives of Everton Football Club. The weary traveller was John William Angus and he had been spotted while playing football in Glasgow by a talent scout who dispatched him down Liverpool where he was to spend a trail period at Anfield. The Scot would have then been taken, by the club conveyance, to meet the lady with whom he would lodge (usually a Mrs Evans on Chepstow Street) before being taken on to meet the Everton captain, Nick Ross. Anfield, shortly before the departure of Everton. Jack Angus was born on 1st December, 1868, in an area of central Glasgow long since given over to commerce, known as Bythswood. He first came to prominense when playing for a local junior club, Kelvingrove Athletic, against Queens...
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George Fleming: The Goalscoring Bank Clerk from Arbroath By Tony Onslow 04/01/2016

It is the summer of 1887 and the Everton team pose, at the Sandon, with the trophy they had just won after beating Oakfield Rovers by five goals to nothing. Two of these goals had been scored by a man, sitting left of the centre row, who had recently moved to Merseyside from Scotland. His name was George Spink Fleming and he was destined to etch his name in to the record books of Everton Football Club. Fleming, along with his twin sister Jemima, was born on the 4th of November 1859 in the Forfarshire town of Arbroath. His father was the owner of a grocery store that was situated at 72 Marketgate.  The 1881 census tells us that the family had moved to number 80 Marketgate and George, then age 22, listed his occupation as that of a Bank Clerk. He was also playing football for the leading club in the area. The above photograph, taken in 1882, shows the Arbroath...
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“Our Tam” McInnes, an Everton First By Tony Onslow 23/02/2016

When the Football Clubs of Everton and Liverpool run out to meet each other in the forthcoming Merseyside derby game, it will be for the 194th time in the League. No other city in England can claim to have staged more local derby games at the top level of English football than Liverpool. The game will take place on the former home of the Everton Club at Anfield before a capacity and fiercely partisan, crowd and the atmosphere will be electric.  Yet, when these two deadly rivals first locked horns with each other it was not at one of their present day homes but on a cricket ground before a crowd of 10,000 people at Hawthorne Road in Bootle. The date was April 1893 and the occasion was the final of Liverpool Senior Cup. There was much local speculation as the match approached whether the team from Goodison Park would include any of its Football League players, because the season was now...
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In Search of John Houlding

This article is not intended to either praise or condemn John Houlding for the role he played in the decision made by Everton Football Club to move away from Anfield. It is merely an effort to try and throw some light on this "larger than life" character who played a big part in the establishing the game of Association Football in his home town of Liverpool. Local records reveal that John Houlding was baptised on 4th August 1833, at St Martin-in the-Field church and that he was the second of three sons born to Thomas Houlding, a cow keeper, and his wife Alice.  The family resided at 19 Tenderden Street where the income from Thomas Houlding's occupation enabled him to provide his children with a good standard of education and a comfortable home in which to live. The 1851 census revealed that John Houlding was still living in Tenderden Street where, along with his younger brother William, he listed his occupation as...
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