In Search of John Houlding-by Tony Onslow

This article is not intended to either praise or condemn John Houlding for the role he played in the decision, made by Everton Football Club, to move away from Anfield. It is merely an effort to try and throw some light on this “larger than life character” who played a big part in the establishing the game of Association Football in his home town of Liverpool.   Local records reveal that John Houlding was baptised, 4-08-1833, at St Martin-in the-Field church and that he was the second of three sons born to Thomas Houlding, a Cow keeper, and his wife Alice. The family reside at 19 Tenderden Street where the income from Thomas Houlding’s occupation enables him to provide his children with a good standard of education and a comfortable home in which to live.   The 1851 census reveal that John Houlding is still living in Tenderden Street where, along with his younger brother William, he lists his occupation as “Auditing at home”....
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Everton and KitAid

Rob Sawyer for EFC Heritage Society 11/10/2016 Thanks to an act of generosity in a time of adversity, a corner of Malawi, 5,000 miles from Goodison Park, will be forever Everton. John Mulcahy was a lifelong Blue – attending his first match in April 1976 when Everton defeated Stoke 2-1. John had Noonan Syndrome (NS), which, in spite of being relatively commonplace and having a major impact on lives, remains a comparatively little-known condition. The syndrome did not stop him from becoming a Lower Bullens season ticket holder and regular attendee at away fixtures. Sadly John’s health deteriorated in the last five years of his life before he passed away on December 21st 2014, aged 47. John’s parents, Frances and Bob, were determined to find a deserving new home for John’s collection of 23 Everton shirts; they located it thanks to KitAid. The charity was founded by Derrick Williams, who, on a humanitarian visit to Tanzania in 1988, was struck by the positive...
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A Tribute to Matt Woods

By Rob Sawyer 14/10/2014 Matt Woods (1 NOVEMBER 1931 - 26 SEPTEMBER 2014) Skelmersdale-born Maurice “Matt” Woods, a centre-half on Everton’s books in the 1950s, passed away on 26 September aged 82. He had been playing as a wing-half in the Wigan Sunday League when his uncle wrote to Everton requesting a trial for his nephew. Having impressed in the B team, he signed amateur forms at 15 and by the 1949-50 season he was a regular in the Reserves – alongside the likes of Don Donovan, Tommy Clinton, Wally “Nobby” Fielding, Jimmy O’Neill and Harry Catterick. An early Reserves appearance brought praise in the local press: Everton Reserves ‘Derby’ Victory 24 December 1949, Evening Express Blues’ Juniors Clever Another of Everton’s younger players who showed up well was right half Matt Woods, who comes from Skelmersdale. Possibly a little slow on occasion, Woods at the same time proved that he realises the requirement of the complete wing-half and his use of the ball was always judicious. Having...
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William Charles Cuff

Transcribed by Billy Smith   Great Football Legislator February 7, 1949. The Liverpool Daily Post Mr. W.C. Cuff Dies Mr. William Charles Cuff, president of the Football league, and one of the original members of Everton F.C, died yesterday, aged 80. A Liverpool solicitor, he was one of football’s greatest legislators and was the man who introduced the system of numbering players. The rejection of a plan, a few years ago, for pool betting subsides to football was one of his successes. He consistently opposed this. Mr. Cuff had been president of the Football league from 1939, succeeding Mr. Charles E. Sutcliffe. He was also vice-president of the Football Association and a member of the International Board. His association with the Goodison club was almost lifelong. He joined as a director in 1894 and served Everton as director, chairman, and secretary over fifty years. Last may he resigned from the Board after differences of opinion with his fellow directors. Mr. Cuff was in London last weekend...
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