Sponsorship deals in the early 1900s ‘Everton by Postcard’

Sponsorship deals in the early 1900s ‘Everton by Postcard’ By Brendan Connolly In the early 1900s, postcards were the equivalent of current day text messages. Very few people had telephones, so the postal system was the main method of communication. As a result, demand dictated that there were four mail deliveries per day, with the last post being late in the evening. It was not unusual to post a letter or postcard early in the morning and receive a reply the same day. Postcards carried a lower postal rate than letters and by the early 1900s picture postcards had become very popular and companies seized the opportunity to use them to advertise. Morris Evans Household Oils were based in Festiniog, North Wales and put their name to a postcard illustrating our 1906 FA Cup-winning team. The company claimed that their products were a remedy for rheumatism, sciatica, lumbago and sore throats. They also prided themselves on how effective their oils were for dogs and farm...
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Harry Williams – Death of a Mascot by Rob Sawyer

Aside from the iconic Toffee Lady, Everton supporters in the 1930s also possessed two unofficial mascots. Harry Williams of Westminster Road, Kirkdale, and his near neighbour, William Jones, would “play up” for Blues fans both home and away. Williams would wear his trademark mock policeman’s uniform, decorated with the club colours whilst Jones would don a blue and white chess-board suit. In the days before fences and enclosures, the firm friends were often permitted to “conduct” the crowds from the cinder path bordering the pitch. When Everton travelled to St Andrew’s on 11 February 1939 for a FA Cup 5th round fixture against Birmingham City – the “blues brothers” were determined to entertain fellow fans and be entertained by the champions-elect. Press photographers captured Harry Williams in his trademark bobby outfit (with the number 9 emblazoned on the lapels) but, sadly, tragedy would strike. The Liverpool Evening Express described how 44-year-old Williams was walking with a crowd towards the stadium when...
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Joseph Davies, the Welsh International from Shropshire

Joseph Davies, the Welsh International from Shropshire. The picture above shows the last resting of Joseph Davies who played for Everton during the season that they became founder members of the Football League. He had been born, 27-6-1869, at St Martins in North West Shropshire and baptised at Preesgwyn Methodist Chapel. Records reveal that he was the son of Stephen Davies, a Blacksmith at the local Coal Mine, and his wife Harriet. Both of them had been born in St Martins. The 1881 census finds the family living Chirk Bank Row in Weston Rhyn where Joseph, along with his two brothers, is listed as a Scholar. On leaving school he began working at the local Colliery and was playing for Chirk AAA from when he joined Everton in November 1888. It is reasonable to assume that he lived, during his time with Everton, at the family home because he could catch a train from the tiny local Railway Station (now closed)...
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Joe McClure

Joe McClure Everton Career 1929-1933  Researched by Billy Smith, Photographs supplied by Brendon Connelly & Compiled By Richard Gilliam On Behalf of the EFC Heritage Society WikipediaEVERTON SIGN WALLSEND PLAYER Hartlepool Mail Monday 4 November 1929 Joseph Henry McClure, a young half-back now playing for Wallsend. in the North-Eastern League, was signed on by Everton following his club's game with Hartlepool’s Reserves on Saturday. McClure, who plays on either wing, was on the books of Preston North End before joining Wallsend, and is 22 years of age, 5ft. 9m. height, and weighs11ist. 4lb EVERTON RESERVES 7 WEST BROMWICH ALBION RESERVES 3 November 11th 1929. Liverpool Post and Mercury. Everton played their best game of the season against the Albion at Goodison Park in the Central League game and won by 7 goals to 3. The whole team excelled in footcraft, combination, and skill Wilkinson was the spearhead of the attack and in scoring five of the seven goals revealed speed, skill, expert ball distribution, and a deadly finish. Ritchie and Easton scored Everton's...
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