William Black, a Blue from the Hebrides. – Tony Onslow

  Born within the sight and sounds of burning sparks and roaring bellows, William Black was the first football player to arrive at Goodison Park who had been born in the mist covered islands of the Inner Hebrides where his Father William, had chosen to make a home for himself and his Wife Catherine. The couple had first met – and married – at Blackburn Street in the Plantation area of Govan (now part of Glasgow) where their first child, Duncan junior, was born. Shortly after this event, Duncan excepted the position of Village Blacksmith at Torosay on the Island of Mull and set up home at a location known as The Lochbury Croft and it was here that William - their 4rd child - was born on the 5th of September 1882. He spent the early part of his life on The Isle of Mull until the death of his Father - on the 2nd of January 1889 - forced Catherine to...
Read More

EVERTON IN THE LEAGUE CUP AT GOODISON PARK – STEVE ZOCEK

The League Cup was introduced to the top four divisions in the 1960/61 season. For the first seven years the final was played over two legs (home and away), before being moved to Wembley in 1967. The competition has had many sponsors starting in the 1981/82 season when it was known as the Milk Cup until 1985/86. It then had a change of sponsorship as Littlewoods took over, then Rumbelows and many more. Everton’s first involvement saw them play their first and only game in the first round, drawn at home to Accrington Stanley. Evertonians didn’t appear to take the competition seriously as only 18,246 attended the game played on Wednesday 12th October 1960. A brace from Frank Wignall, and one from Jimmy Harris gave the home side a comfortable passage into the next round. Everton were fortunately drawn at home for the next two rounds defeating Walsall and Bury. A victory at Tranmere was followed by defeat at Shrewsbury Town in...
Read More

Any Chance of a Trial Mr Kelly? – Mike Royden

Any Chance of a Trial Mr Kelly? Charlie Lewis had a dream How many of us have dreamt of turning up at Goodison with our boots, blagging our way inside, finding the manager’s office, knocking on the door and asking if there is any chance of a trial, being told ‘Sure son, no problem, come right this way’, playing a blinder, outshining all the other trialists who had been invited to play, walking off feeling you had blown it, only for the manager, not only to take you on, but to put you straight into the first team next Saturday alongside the England centre-forward? And then you woke up. Nah, it would never happen in a million years. But hold on, who is this young lad on the wing taking a pass from Alex Stevenson and crossing it to Tommy Lawton to bury into the net? Charlie Lewis?  Never heard of him.  But he too had that dream – the difference being he actually turned it...
Read More

Hugh Goldie, a tough tackling half back from Ayrshire. – Tony Onslow

The First World War had been raging for over a year when the funeral cortege of 17-year-old Robert Goldie brought the small Ayrshire town of Hurlford to a halt. Born in Liverpool, he was the son of well-known local man who had once played football for Everton. Hugh Goldie was born, 10th of February 1874, at 32, The Vennal in the Ayrshire town of Dalry where his Father Hugh worked as a Coal Miner while his Mother Janet, had worked in a Textile Mill. The family later moved to the Riccarton area of Kilmarnock where Hugh, after completing his education, began work in a Bonded Store Warehouse while playing football for a local club, Hurlford Thistle. He represented them, on the 13th of February 1892, in the Ayrshire Cup Final that was played at Rugby Park, Kilmarnock but their opponent’s, Annbank, beat them 3-0. In July of the that year Hugh Goldie married local Textile Worker Grace McGinn and the couple...
Read More