T.G. Jones at 100

T.G. Jones at 100 Posted by Rob Sawyer on October 12, 2017 12 October 2017 marks the centenary of the birth of Thomas George Ronald Jones in Queensferry, Flintshire. The tall, quiet son of a Connah’s Quay coal merchant would find his footballing feet at Wrexham F.C. but he would achieve immortality at Goodison Park. His first two initials, T.G. became synonymous with the art of cultured defensive play. In March 1936 the footballing eye of Toffees director Jack Sharp - himself a playing great – recognised the promise in the leggy teenage centre-half. In no time T.G. had swapped The Racecourse Ground for Goodison but the callow youth initially struggled on Merseyside. Only upon returning to live just across the Welsh border did he settle and secure his place in the Everton first eleven, at the expense of Charlie Gee. Goodison Park had never seen anything quite like T.G. – here was a centre-half who could deal with the physicality of rough-house centre-forwards...
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Everton’s First League Cup Semi-Final

In January 1977 Everton were only two matches away from their first Wembley final in the 17-year existence of the League Cup. Bolton Wanderers of the Second Division side stood between them and the Twin Towers. Everton had parted company with manager Billy Bingham just ten days before the first leg. With the search underway for Bingham’s successor – Bobby Robson being the original preferred choice - Steve Burtenshaw took charge in a caretaker capacity. Everton’s path to the semi-final commenced on August Bank Holiday Monday with a comfortable 3-0 defeat of Cambridge United. A solitary Bob Latchford goal was enough to ease past Stockport County at Edgeley Park in the next round, after which a home defeat of Coventry City set up a quarter final tie with Manchester United. Everton silenced the 57,738 Old Trafford crowd, crushing the hosts 3-0. The Blues hosted the Trotters in the first semi-final leg with 54,032 fans inside echoing, “Tell me ma, me ma; I don’t want no tea,...
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In Search of the First Everton Stalwart

Rain was falling heavily as I left the train at New Brighton Railway Station in search of a former Everton captain who, I had discovered, was buried in Wallasey at Rake Lane cemetery. The person, whose last resting place I was searching for, was George Dobson. I knew he had died in 1941 but, as I had no grave number, I searched for over an hour without success before, wet through, I started to head for home. However, as I passed through the main gate, I noticed the resident stonemasons’ office and knocked at the door. My luck was in. I was greeted by a man whose name, I later learned, was Alan and he turned out to be an Everton season ticket holder. I told him why I was here, what I was looking for, and he did all in his power to assist. Having found the information I required he then took me, by car, to area where George...
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The Man Who Coached Everton to Their First League Title

It is the summer of 1891 and the players of Everton Football Club proudly pose with Football League championship trophy which they recently won for the first time. The club executives, who were in charge of team selection, must take much of the credit for this triumph because of their clever dealings in the transfer market. The extra players they had brought in had proved to be good enough to carry of the championship after finishing second in the previous season. Their fitness and welfare however, they had placed in the hands of a former Everton player who, in the absence of a club manager, was virtually in charge of operations outside of the boardroom. His name was David Waugh and he stands, in mufti, in the top right hand corner of this picture. Waugh was born the son of factory worker in the Stirlingshire town of Larbert in the year of 1861 before the family moved to Glasgow some time...
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