Andrew Hannah

By being the first man to captain both Everton Football Club and their local rivals Liverpool, Andrew Hannah holds a unique position in Merseyside folklore. He was born of Irish parentage on 17 September 1864, at Renton, Dunbartonshire where his father, Henry, was running a grocery shop. The premises stood at 72 Main Street where he was assisted by his wife, Margaret. The couple had one other son. Hannah started his football career playing at full back with the Renton club and was in the side that beat Vale of Leven, by 3 goals to 1, in the 1885 Scottish FA Cup Final. He was also in the Renton side when they lifted the trophy for a second time in 1888 with a 6-1 win over Cambuslang. On 3 March that year, he won his only international cap when he represented Scotland in a 5-1 win over Wales at Easter Road in Edinburgh. On 27 April 1888, Andrew Hannah married Jessie Thompson at...
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The Tale of a Former Everton Full Back

  George Molyneux was on the books of Southampton when he was selected for England, against Scotland, and thus became the first Liverpool born man, having previously played football for Everton, to do so. The 1881 census tells us that George, who was then 6 years old, is living, along with his parents, at 29 Sessions Road in the Kirkdale area of the City. The 1901 census then reveals that the family had moved to nearby Croyland Street and that George, now 15 years old, had begun serving an apprenticeship as a Plumber. It is around three years later his name starts to appear in the local sporting press while playing football for his local amateur side, Kirkdale. On the 9th of September 1895 Molyneux was selected to represent the Liverpool & District side, against the Everton Combination XI, on the home of the St Elphins club in Warrington. After the game he was invited for a trail match with his...
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Ted Critchley – My Dad

Rob Sawyer in Conversation with Doris Holmes (née Critchley) Ted Critchley was the Trevor Steven, Dave Thomas or Alex Scott of his day: fast and skilful with an unerring ability to dribble and deliver crosses into the box from the right flank.Ted made his name as an outside-right with hometown club, Stockport County, whom he joined as a 17-year-old in 1922 after impressing in local football. His 188 games for The Hatters, including a few alongside Harry Catterick Senior, saw him play Second Division football and collect a Manchester Senior Cup winner's medal. Everton, on the look-out for a replacement for Sam Chedgzoy, came calling in December 1926 — albeit after some procrastination. Ted turned out to be an astute signing as he and Alec Troup marauded down the flanks to help “Dixie” reach his glorious 60 in 1928. Famed for his pace, Ted would later joke: “Let’s put it this way – I could run half-an-hour in 25 minutes!” In his 8-year...
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Charlie Gee: Stockport, Everton and England

Charlie Gee’s story is one of a remarkable rise from Stockport church football to Everton and  England honours.  In three consecutive seasons he played Third, Second and First Division football – culminating in a 1932 league championship medal. Charlie also holds the key to the Everton career of one of the most important men in the Toffees’ illustrious history – Harry Catterick. Charles William Gee was born on 6 April 1909 in the Reddish district of Stockport. He was one of eight children born to Edward and Jane Gee. Edward was a sweet shop owner who, as a side-line, also operated as a bookmaker from his cellar Charlie’s elder brother Ted was reputed to the best footballer in the family but broke his leg in a fall when working on a roof. Like Ted, Charlie trained to be a joiner but was a passionate about sport – adept at cricket, swimming and football. Appearances as right-back and captain of the North Reddish...
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