Andrew Hannah, The only man to Captain Everton & Liverpool – David Prentice

Andrew Hannah, The only man to Captain Everton & Liverpool – David Prentice

Everton Heritage Society and Everton Football Club rededicate grave of important football figure The only man in history to captain Everton and Liverpool lies in a marked grave for the first time thanks to the efforts of the Everton Heritage Society and Everton Football Club. Andrew Hannah, who captained Everton to their first League Championship success in 1891, then led Liverpool to Lancashire League and Football League Division Two titles, had lain in an unmarked grave at Kilbowie Cemetery in Clydebank since his untimely passing in 1940. On Saturday Everton Heritage Society Chairman Brendan Connolly and former Echo Sports Editor Ken Rogers attended a ceremony at Kilbowie Cemetery along with Everton FC ambassador Ian Snodin to rededicate the grave and ensure that one of football’s most important figures had his achievements duly recognised.                                                                     Everton's 1891 champions, captained by Andrew Hannah (front left) Born...
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Britton’s Blues

In September 1948, Cliff Britton completed the short journey from Turf Moor to Goodison Park to become Everton manager. In so doing, he became the first former player to hold the position and his appointment offered hope for the future. At Burnley he was considered one of the most promising managers in England, leading the Clarets To promotion from the Second Division, an FA Cup final and third place in the top flight in successive years. Britton was a favourite son of Goodison, having enjoyed a distinguished playing career as half-back. He was, recorded a 1936 profile, ‘One of the most gentlemanly and unassuming players in the game. An artiste in ball control and delightful to watch. Revels in linking up with the forwards, whilst his accurate lobbed centres are ever a menace.’ Britton had clear ideas of how he should manage Everton. In agreeing to take charge he laid down precise terms of employment to which the board agreed. These included: ‘Full power over...
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T.G. Jones at 100

T.G. Jones at 100 Posted by Rob Sawyer on October 12, 2017 12 October 2017 marks the centenary of the birth of Thomas George Ronald Jones in Queensferry, Flintshire. The tall, quiet son of a Connah’s Quay coal merchant would find his footballing feet at Wrexham F.C. but he would achieve immortality at Goodison Park. His first two initials, T.G. became synonymous with the art of cultured defensive play. In March 1936 the footballing eye of Toffees director Jack Sharp - himself a playing great – recognised the promise in the leggy teenage centre-half. In no time T.G. had swapped The Racecourse Ground for Goodison but the callow youth initially struggled on Merseyside. Only upon returning to live just across the Welsh border did he settle and secure his place in the Everton first eleven, at the expense of Charlie Gee. Goodison Park had never seen anything quite like T.G. – here was a centre-half who could deal with the physicality of rough-house centre-forwards...
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Everton’s First League Cup Semi-Final

In January 1977 Everton were only two matches away from their first Wembley final in the 17-year existence of the League Cup. Bolton Wanderers of the Second Division side stood between them and the Twin Towers. Everton had parted company with manager Billy Bingham just ten days before the first leg. With the search underway for Bingham’s successor – Bobby Robson being the original preferred choice - Steve Burtenshaw took charge in a caretaker capacity. Everton’s path to the semi-final commenced on August Bank Holiday Monday with a comfortable 3-0 defeat of Cambridge United. A solitary Bob Latchford goal was enough to ease past Stockport County at Edgeley Park in the next round, after which a home defeat of Coventry City set up a quarter final tie with Manchester United. Everton silenced the 57,738 Old Trafford crowd, crushing the hosts 3-0. The Blues hosted the Trotters in the first semi-final leg with 54,032 fans inside echoing, “Tell me ma, me ma; I don’t want no tea,...
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