Keys and Warmby — The Duo from Derby

In preparation for life in the Football League, Everton Football Club made several new signings during the summer of 1888. Two of them, Keys and Warmby, had joined them from Derby County. Despite the fact that the local newspapers make no reference to their background, they were in fact related by marriage and had reached the Mersey Seaport by two slightly different routes. William Henry Warmby was born, 1863, in South Yorkshire where he began his football career with his local team, Rotherham Town. Sometime around 1883 he moved to Derby where he took up a job as an engine fitter (Midland Railway?) and played his football with a team made up of players from the congregation at the church of St Luke. They were one of the lesser known teams in the town and played on a small ground at Peat Street. On November 8th, 1884 they travelled to face Wolverhampton Wanderers in an FA Cup tie, on their home...
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The Life of Hunter Hart

Hunter Hart was always recognisable by a distinctive quiff which pre-dated that of Wolves' Billy Wright. He served Everton with distinction on the field in the 1920s and behind a desk in the 1930s but, unfortunately, his association with the club he loved was to end prematurely, as was his life. Born on Glasgow on 11 March 1897 to Alexander (a carter) and Jessie, Hart grew up less than half a mile from Celtic's stadium. By the age of 14, living in Shettleston, Lanarkshire, he had lost the sight in one eye in, what was described as, "a childhood accident". He was never on record talking about this disability and it certainly did not hold back his football career.   He made his name with Parkhead Juniors FC in Scottish non league ("Junior") football. Spotted by Airdrieonians' manager John Chapman, Hart signed for the league outfit at the start of the 1918/19 season. His Airdrie debut, as a 21-year-old inside-forward, was on 18...
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Support KitAid at Goodison

Support KitAid at Goodison Latest news 01 December Everton in the Community launch The new partnership was officially launched at the home game against Swansea City on 19 November and this was preceded by a really good article on the club website which involved a player (Bryan Oviedo) promoting the appeal by holding up an Everton shirt with KitAid on the back. Collections were held at different locations around Goodison and once again we are very grateful to our friends from the Everton Heritage Society who helped to promote and collect kit for us. Our relationship with Everton will continue to grow and EITC have promised to keep our partnership alive by helping to promote KitAid to their fan base. We also agreed to hold another kit collection day at the game versus Watford next May. All in all, a really great new partnership for KitAid and we are grateful for all of the support we have received in getting this set up. Everton in the Community has...
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Jack Cock – Scorer, Singer, Soldier, Superstar

EVERTON HISTORY Jack Cock – Scorer, Singer, Soldier, Superstar ROB SAWYER (EFC HERITAGE SOCIETY) 18/11/2016 Relatively few Cornishmen have represented Everton but several have left their mark on Merseyside. Mike Trebilcock carved his name into FA Cup folk-lore whilst Nigel Martyn established himself as the finest Goodison goal-keeper since Neville Southall. However, the most remarkable life story is that of Jack Cock: international footballer, team manager, war hero and star of stage and screen. John Gilbert “Jack” Cock, the third child of James (an iron-trimmer) and Eliza, entered the world on 15 November 1893 in the Cornish village of Phillack, close to the port town of Hayle. By the time Jack was seven James had relocated the family from this bucolic setting to Fulham in West London. Jack would earn pocket money selling chocolates to spectators inside Craven Cottage and dream of becoming a footballer. Such hopes faded when James' work took the family to the footballing backwater of Camborne in Cornwall. Nevertheless Jack...
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Alan Ball Remembered DVD

Former Everton star Ronny Goodlass is will have a DVD on sale at St Luke's Church and the Winslow every home game. The DVD pays tribute to one of the Club's most iconic legends, Alan Ball. Along with the DVD is a special tribute programme for the Ball of Fire play, both on sale for a special price of £9.99 instead of £12.99. Ronny will at St Luke's to autograph the items. Winger Goodlass was a boot boy for Ball in his youth and came to be in awe of the man who scored 79 goals in 251 games during a dazzling five-year spell at Goodison Park. The highlight of that stint was helping Harry Catterick's great side ease to the League Championship title in 1970 as part of the ‘Holy Trinity’ alongside Colin Harvey and Howard Kendall. The DVD re-lives all the best Ball moments through his own words and those of the men who knew him best. Goodlass, Kendall, Joe Royle and Graeme...
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In Search of John Houlding-by Tony Onslow

This article is not intended to either praise or condemn John Houlding for the role he played in the decision, made by Everton Football Club, to move away from Anfield. It is merely an effort to try and throw some light on this “larger than life character” who played a big part in the establishing the game of Association Football in his home town of Liverpool.   Local records reveal that John Houlding was baptised, 4-08-1833, at St Martin-in the-Field church and that he was the second of three sons born to Thomas Houlding, a Cow keeper, and his wife Alice. The family reside at 19 Tenderden Street where the income from Thomas Houlding’s occupation enables him to provide his children with a good standard of education and a comfortable home in which to live.   The 1851 census reveal that John Houlding is still living in Tenderden Street where, along with his younger brother William, he lists his occupation as “Auditing at home”....
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Everton in 1915 – Pete Jones

1915 was a bittersweet year for Everton FC. The 1914-15 season was played entirely during wartime and was probably the most controversial ever, resulting in divisions within sport that still find echoes today, and yet Everton were able to celebrate their second league title. Before a ball was kicked British forces became locked in a constant struggle alongside the French against a German army that was the best in the world. By the time Everton lifted the trophy in late April the British had suffered appalling losses, with the original expeditionary force all but destroyed; that the war had lasted until the spring of 1915 with no sign of a conclusion was a surprise to almost everyone. Although press censorship kept the home public unaware of the realities of the war, the twists and turns of the 1914-15 season must have diverted them from their anxieties. For Everton fans in the trenches the arrival of the results must have been what...
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Why Leicester Fosse? – by Tony Onslow

History will be made today when the present Premier League champions take to the field for what is their first ever FA Cup tie at Goodison Park. The visitors were formed in 1884 by a group of young men from a local evangelical chapel who decided to form a football team that they chose to call Leicester Fosse. This suffix was chosen because the old Roman Road, known as the Fosseway, had once passed through the area and a military encampment was “set up” to protect it from attack near to the spot where it forded the River Soar. The group then all agreed to pay nine old pence membership fee and another nine pence was collected to purchase a football. They then played at several different locations before a certain Miss Westland, as local folklore has it, suggested they constructed an enclosure at a site known on Walnut Street which, in turn, became Filbert Street.   Leicester Fosse Football Club...
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Andrew Gibson, The Blue from Dalmellington.- by Tony Onslow

  Although destined never to play a Football League match for the club Andrew Gibson played a leading role in the years leading up to Everton becoming founder members of the new organisation. He had been at the club for two seasons when the above picture was taken and he had travelled a somewhat roundabout route to reach to reach the town where he would spend the rest of his days. Andrew Gibson was born,31-1-1864, at number 3 house in the High Main Street of the Ayrshire market town of Dalmellington. His Father and Grandfather, both named Alexander, belonged to the accident order of Fleshers (Qualified Slaughter Men) thus making the family prominent members of the local community. The 1881 census lets us know that Andrew, now 17, has moved to the town of Kilmarnock which was expanding due to the fact that it is now the headquarters of Glasgow and South Western Railway Company. He is living with relatives, at 22, West...
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The Merseyside Derby Game. – by Tony Onslow

  The people of the Merseyside “turn in on themselves” today as their two vintage football clubs line up to face each other for the 194th time. No other City in England can claim to have staged more local Derby games, at the top level of English football, than Liverpool. The atmosphere will be electric yet when these two deadly rivals first locked horns with each other it was on a football pitch that has long since faded in to local folklore. The date was April 1893 and the occasion was the final of Liverpool Senior Cup which took place, in front of 10,000 people, on the present home of Bootle Cricket Club at Wadham Road. The encounter was settled by a single goal, that was scored, in favour of Liverpool, by Scotsman Tom Wylie who had once played for Everton but, following the acrimonious “split” had chosen to remain at Anfield. His new club nevertheless, were members of the Lancashire League...
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