Everton in 1916 – Pete Jones

1916 was dominated by the battle of the Somme which marked the point in WW1 when British and Commonwealth troops started to shoulder a major part of the fighting on the Western Front. The Somme also saw the deaths of five men who had played for three football clubs called Everton. The first day, 1st July 1916 was a disaster, with nearly 20,000 killed and 40,000 wounded. Among them was 2nd Lt. Malcolm Fraser of the Cameronians who was killed in the afternoon leading a patrol into no man’s land near Ovillers. His commanding officer wrote that his sacrifice meant a planned attack was called off probably saving hundreds of lives. Malcolm Fraser was born in New York State to a Scottish father and an American mother; he was a founder member of the Everton club in Valparaiso in Chile and was at university in Edinburgh when war broke out. He has no known grave and is remembered on the Thiepval...
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With Everton at Great Lever by Tony Onslow

There has long been some confusion concerning the outcome of the first competitive game, played by Everton, that was won, eventually, by their opponents Great Lever. Early local historians state that Everton drew the tie, 1-1, and then were decisively beaten, in the replay, by 8 goals to 1, on Stanley Park. However, the record books of the Lancashire FA, held in Leyland, prove that Great Lever did indeed venture in to next round of the competition but the re-play, which was rather acrimonious, took place in their home town of Bolton.   The parishioners of St Bartholomew’s church had formed a football club in 1877 before making their headquarters, one year later, at a local tavern that was called the Old Robin Hood. Here they changed their name to Great Lever and set about constructing a simple enclosure that was adjacent to a notorious local land mark called Wellington Yard, which by its description, appeared to be a Tannery. The club...
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George Harrison

A MOVING tribute was paid to 'one of our own' as representatives of some of Britain's biggest football clubs descended on South Derbyshire. George Harrison was a Church Gresley teenager with a dream of making it to the top when he started playing football for his local team, Gresley Rovers, back in 1910. It was the beginning of stunning career that later saw him win a top flight title with Everton and two caps for England. Amidst it all he was called to fight for his country on the front line during the First World War. THE Everton FC Heritage Society has paid for the new headstone for footballer George Harrison, who went to play for England Everton. Pictured from left are society chairman Paul Wharton, ex-player Ian Snodin, Reverend Henry Corbett, and society vice-chariman Peter Lupson. VIOLINIST  Daniel Axworthy plays while , Paul Wharton, Peter Lupson, Rev Henry Corbett and Ian Snodin look on. CHARLIE Smith placed flowers on the grave. ,also to the right Kieran...
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Everton and KitAid

Rob Sawyer for EFC Heritage Society 11/10/2016 Thanks to an act of generosity in a time of adversity, a corner of Malawi, 5,000 miles from Goodison Park, will be forever Everton. John Mulcahy was a lifelong Blue – attending his first match in April 1976 when Everton defeated Stoke 2-1. John had Noonan Syndrome (NS), which, in spite of being relatively commonplace and having a major impact on lives, remains a comparatively little-known condition. The syndrome did not stop him from becoming a Lower Bullens season ticket holder and regular attendee at away fixtures. Sadly John’s health deteriorated in the last five years of his life before he passed away on December 21st 2014, aged 47. John’s parents, Frances and Bob, were determined to find a deserving new home for John’s collection of 23 Everton shirts; they located it thanks to KitAid. The charity was founded by Derrick Williams, who, on a humanitarian visit to Tanzania in 1988, was struck by the positive...
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A Tribute to Matt Woods

By Rob Sawyer 14/10/2014 Matt Woods (1 NOVEMBER 1931 - 26 SEPTEMBER 2014) Skelmersdale-born Maurice “Matt” Woods, a centre-half on Everton’s books in the 1950s, passed away on 26 September aged 82. He had been playing as a wing-half in the Wigan Sunday League when his uncle wrote to Everton requesting a trial for his nephew. Having impressed in the B team, he signed amateur forms at 15 and by the 1949-50 season he was a regular in the Reserves – alongside the likes of Don Donovan, Tommy Clinton, Wally “Nobby” Fielding, Jimmy O’Neill and Harry Catterick. An early Reserves appearance brought praise in the local press: Everton Reserves ‘Derby’ Victory 24 December 1949, Evening Express Blues’ Juniors Clever Another of Everton’s younger players who showed up well was right half Matt Woods, who comes from Skelmersdale. Possibly a little slow on occasion, Woods at the same time proved that he realises the requirement of the complete wing-half and his use of the ball was always judicious. Having...
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Everton and Lille

By Pete Jones 05/10/2014 It is a surprising fact but Everton have never played a French club in competitive action, so our visit to Lille on Thursday 23 October will be a first. However, there are Everton links to the Lille area, but you have to go back nearly a century to find them. The Great War Lille, the largest city in northern France was in the war zone in the autumn of 1914 after the German invasion was halted at the battle of the Marne. The fighting moved ever north as both sides tried to outflank each other. Lille fell after a short siege on 13th October and the focus of the fighting moved to the higher ground between the city and the Belgian town of Ypres 17 miles to the north west . Here the Germans brought up hastily gathered reserves and attempted to punch through to the Channel ports. British, Indian and French forces held on to Ypres by the...
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A Tribute to Alexander “Sandy”Young

Everton honour 1906 cup hero Sandy Young by Lyndon Lloyd | 03/09/2014 Alex "Sandy" Young was honoured today in Edinburgh   Everton FC and Everton Heritage Society unveiled a new headstone in Edinburgh's Seafield cemetery today to mark the grave of Alex 'Sandy' Young, one of the club's first legends. Still the fourth-highest goalscorer in Everton's history, Young was the scorer of the winning goal in the 1906 FA Cup Final win over Newcastle United that clinched the trophy for the Blues for the first time. In all, he found the net 127 times in 314 appearances in the decade between 1901 and 1911 but he was troubled in later life by mental illness and a prison sentence for the manslaughter of his brother in Australia before he passed away in 1959. Thanks to the efforts of the Heritage Society, a fundraising effort has finally enabled the erection of a headstone at his grave site which was revealed at a special ceremony attended by club officials, his...
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Paul Power Guest Appearence

            Paul will be appearing at 11:15am to 12:30pm On Sunday 15th January Upstairs at St Lukes Church Paul Power finished his career on a high after signing for Everton in June 1986 for a fee of £65,000. He played in a total of 52 games in the 1986-87, providing valuable experience for a Toffees side who were without key players including Peter Reid and Paul Bracewell for long periods due to injury but still managed to win the league title and give Power a major trophy at long last in his 34th year. His first team chances were more limited in the 1987-88 season when Everton finished fourth under new manager Colin Harvey after the departure of Howard Kendall to Atletico Bilbao, and at the end of the season he retired to join the club's coaching staff. Paul returned to Manchester City were He is now involved with the academy at Manchester City. Paul will be signing Simon Hart Superb Here We Go -The...
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Kevin Sheedy Book available at St Lukes church

You can grab a copy of Kevin Sheedy a book at st Lukes church before each home game until stocks run out for £6.00 KEVIN SHEEDY is an Everton and Republic of Ireland legend with plenty of entertaining stories to tell. The man with one of the best left foots in football played alongside some of the biggest characters in the game during a colourful career. Sheedy started his football life with Hereford United before being spotted by Bob Paisley s Liverpool. But he featured in only five senior games during his Anfield career and crossed Stanley Park to Everton, where he won two League titles and a European Cup Winners Cup medal as well as playing in three FA Cup Finals. Sheedy was a regular fixture in Howard Kendall s celebrated side that brought unprecedented glitter to Goodison. It was during an FA Cup tie against Ipswich in 1985 that his famous free-kick moment came. Sheedy hit the net from...
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William Charles Cuff

Transcribed by Billy Smith   Great Football Legislator February 7, 1949. The Liverpool Daily Post Mr. W.C. Cuff Dies Mr. William Charles Cuff, president of the Football league, and one of the original members of Everton F.C, died yesterday, aged 80. A Liverpool solicitor, he was one of football’s greatest legislators and was the man who introduced the system of numbering players. The rejection of a plan, a few years ago, for pool betting subsides to football was one of his successes. He consistently opposed this. Mr. Cuff had been president of the Football league from 1939, succeeding Mr. Charles E. Sutcliffe. He was also vice-president of the Football Association and a member of the International Board. His association with the Goodison club was almost lifelong. He joined as a director in 1894 and served Everton as director, chairman, and secretary over fifty years. Last may he resigned from the Board after differences of opinion with his fellow directors. Mr. Cuff was in London last weekend...
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