Henry F Briggs, An Everton Goalkeeper – Tony Onslow

Signed as cover for the controversial “Happy Jack” Hillman, Frank Briggs joined Everton, from Darwen, in January 1906 having first played football in the Nottinghamshire Coalfield. He had been born at number 84 dwelling – on the Alfreton Turnpike at Eastwood - in 1872 and was the 3rd of child of John, a Domestic Servant, and his Wife, Lucy. Henry Briggs is missing from the1891 census but contemporary newspaper reports place him keeping goal for a Midland League side who were the forerunners of the Mansfield Town of today. His skills quickly caught the attention of struggling Football League Division One outfit Darwen who gained his signature in February 1894. The Cricket and Football Club ran side by side in the Peaceful Valley and the community offered Briggs, a cricketer of proved ability, terms that would also guarantee him a wage throughout the months of Summer. He immediately took his place under the crossbar but could not prevent the Darreners from being relegated at the end of the season. During the summer he returned home...
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‘King’ Charles: Everton (Trinidad and Tobago) – Richard Gillham

Alfred Charles (Southampton Strip) Alfred Pious Charles was born in Trinidad & Tobago, 11 July 1909. He received his prestigious royal nickname from a 1931 match report when in 1931 the Touring Trinidad & Tobago national team played British Guiana: ‘Playing at centre-half. He shone like a beacon in that position and so amazed the Guianese that they christened him "King Charles". Alfred was very highly regarded in his school days at Newtown Boys’ RC – he was head and shoulders above other boy footballers in Port of Spain. In 1929 he joined the Port of Spain Football League side, Everton FC. In his first season there, Everton captured the FA Cup. The glory days carried on with Everton winning the quadruple three years on the run from 1930 to 1932, the Port of Spain Football League & FA Cup, Sperling Cup & the Wincairns Trophy. The club also won the McKinney Cup against the Rest of the League XI on the...
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Only Once a Blue (10) Charles McGoldrick. – Tony Onslow

Charles McGoldrick was born, 30th of November 1865, at 38 York Terrace in Everton and baptised at the church of Our Lady Immaculate. (This being the case, his birth might well have been attended by the future Director of Everton Football Club - Doctor James Baxter.) He was the first child of Denis, an Irish born Warehouse Man, and his Preston born Wife, Mary. McGoldrick is first reported to be playing football, on Walton Stiles, for the Stanley club but by September 1886 has signed for Oakfield Rovers. Formed by members of a Wesleyan Methodist community they had, that year, opened a new place of worship on Oakfield Road that was adjoined by a church hall. Their home ground was on Lower Breck Road. The club entered the Liverpool Senior knockout and reached the final – 2nd of April 1887 - where they faced Everton on the home of the Bootle club at Hawthorne Road. McGoldrick lined up alongside former Everton...
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DAVIE WILSON THE FIRST £100,000 EVERTON PLAYER – ALMOST – Steve Zocek

Davie Wilson played for Glasgow Rangers from 1956 until 1967. During that time, he made 373 appearances for the Ibrox club. Davie was an outside left who could play anywhere and he wasn’t shy in front of goal either, finding the net 157 times. This included six goals in one game against Falkirk in 1962 which is still a post-war record. Unbeknown to me previously, he caught the eye of Everton when in 1962 he was approached by the Merseyside outfit. Jimmy Greaves at the time was the British record transfer with a fee of £99,999 from AC Milan to Tottenham Hotspurs. Tottenham manager Bill Nicholson didn’t want Jimmy to be the first £100,000 player as he thought the fee might put pressure on him. I caught up with this sprightly 80-year-old to find out about the interest from Everton, and why the move didn’t happen. ‘I was attending to my pigeons in the pigeon loft next...
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Harry Grundy An Everton Winger – Tony Onslow

When Elizabeth Bradley moved to work in Liverpool from Chirk, she caught the eye of William Grundy, then working as Groom, and they were married, in 1870, at the Welsh Chapel dedicated to St David on Brownlow Hill. The couple then settled at 4 Moorside in Neston where the head of the household worked as a Coachman. It was here, on the 15th of March 1883, that their 6th child Thomas Henry was born. He became known affectionately as Harry. The 1891 census finds the family now living at 25 Parkgate Road where William has become the Clerk at the local parish church of St Mary. He was still working at this occupation when Harry, having completed his education, began work as a Bricklayer and play football for West Cheshire League club, Heswell. During the months of Summer, he would earn as much as £80 competing in various athletic events and received accolades for the skill he displayed at the...
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