Winterhalder and Dawson, Everton Wingers – Tony Onslow

Signed to cover the abrupt exit of the Wilson brothers, Arthur Winterhalder, a promising Outside Left, joined Everton from West Ham United. He was descended from a family of Clockmakers who had emigrated from Germany to settle in the Marylebone area of London. His Father Richard did not choose to follow this profession but decided instead to enlisted in the 3rd Dragoon Guards and was stationed at Colchester when he married local girl, Martha Gibbons. Around 1878 Richard left the Army to work as a Carter at Stratford in London. In 1883 he took up position as a Carriers Agent and moved the family to Oxford where Arthur, his 6th child, was born at the 13th of October 1884. The family and missing from 1901 census but records reveal that Arthur Winterhalder married Lucy Skinner, at West Ham, early in 1906. He was reported as being … a local amateur who hails from Wanstead when he made his Southern...
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James McMillan. The Lad from Leven Vale. – Tony Onslow

When the Scottish FA Cup knockout was inaugurated in 1874, Glasgow based Queens Park won it no fewer than 6 times during the first 10 years. Their run of success however, was interrupted, for 3 years running, by a side who came from the small town of Alexandria. They played under the name of Vale of Leven. This Dunbartonshire town, on the 11th of April 1869, was the birthplace of James McMillan. Born to George, a Dye Works Labourer, and his wife Martha on Bryson’s Land, in the parish of Bonhill, he first arrested the attention of the local football agents while playing for Vale of Leven. The club fought their way through the 1890 Scottish FA Cup final where McMillian, playing at inside forward, lined up to face Queens Park at Ibrox. The tie, which needed a re-play to decide the outcome, was won by the Glasgow side. Next season, on October the 12th, McMillan accepted to offer to sign...
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Alfred John Schofield. – Tony Onslow

Following in the footsteps of Edgar Chadwick, Alf Schofield first saw the light of day through the mill chimneys of Blackburn in Lancashire.  He was born 16th of July 1876 at 39 Alexandra Street the 4th child of David, a Machine Maker, and his Wife Betsy. However, following the early death of her Husband, Betsy moved Alfred and his siblings to the comfortable surroundings at 48, Brighton Road in Birkdale where, on the 1881 census, she is reported to be “living by own means”. Alfred Schofield joined Everton, as an amateur, in December 1895 and was first scene by the Goodison spectators on Boxing Day when he replaced Alf Millward for the visit of the Scottish side, Celtic where he scored the deciding goal in 3-2 victory. He made his Football League debut, 7th of March, in 3-2 home win over Preston North End and scored - during the final game of the season – as Everton won 2-1 at Stoke. Schofield next signed a professional form and was paid a wage of £2...
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The Three Young Blues – Tony Onslow

Like many of the young teenagers of Victorian Liverpool, William Gibson Walter Richards and Thomas Whittle would have been drawn towards the new game, association football, the was beginning to sweep the land and would have spent their early teens watching such teams as Everton on Stanley Park. They also would have observed that this particular club had, by 1882, caused the largest number spectators to frame their unguarded playing area. Next year, when they moved to an enclosure, William Gibson appeared in their line-up. Born 1862, he is recorded on the 1871 census living, in Everton, at 34 Hodder Street with his Liverpool born parents William, a Boilermaker, and Anne. The family later moved to 53 Melbourne Street and William was working as a Commercial Clerk when he made his debut for Everton, December 1883, in the local knockout against Liverpool Ramblers. He scored one of the goals in a 4-1 win. Gibson then helped Everton to reach the final of this contest and was in...
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