Keys and Warmby — The Duo from Derby

In preparation for life in the Football League, Everton Football Club made several new signings during the summer of 1888. Two of them, Keys and Warmby, had joined them from Derby County. Despite the fact that the local newspapers make no reference to their background, they were in fact related by marriage and had reached the Mersey Seaport by two slightly different routes. William Henry Warmby was born, 1863, in South Yorkshire where he began his football career with his local team, Rotherham Town. Sometime around 1883 he moved to Derby where he took up a job as an engine fitter (Midland Railway?) and played his football with a team made up of players from the congregation at the church of St Luke. They were one of the lesser known teams in the town and played on a small ground at Peat Street. On November 8th, 1884 they travelled to face Wolverhampton Wanderers in an FA Cup tie, on their home...
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The Life of Hunter Hart

Hunter Hart was always recognisable by a distinctive quiff which pre-dated that of Wolves' Billy Wright. He served Everton with distinction on the field in the 1920s and behind a desk in the 1930s but, unfortunately, his association with the club he loved was to end prematurely, as was his life. Born on Glasgow on 11 March 1897 to Alexander (a carter) and Jessie, Hart grew up less than half a mile from Celtic's stadium. By the age of 14, living in Shettleston, Lanarkshire, he had lost the sight in one eye in, what was described as, "a childhood accident". He was never on record talking about this disability and it certainly did not hold back his football career.   He made his name with Parkhead Juniors FC in Scottish non league ("Junior") football. Spotted by Airdrieonians' manager John Chapman, Hart signed for the league outfit at the start of the 1918/19 season. His Airdrie debut, as a 21-year-old inside-forward, was on 18...
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Support KitAid at Goodison

Support KitAid at Goodison Latest news 01 December Everton in the Community launch The new partnership was officially launched at the home game against Swansea City on 19 November and this was preceded by a really good article on the club website which involved a player (Bryan Oviedo) promoting the appeal by holding up an Everton shirt with KitAid on the back. Collections were held at different locations around Goodison and once again we are very grateful to our friends from the Everton Heritage Society who helped to promote and collect kit for us. Our relationship with Everton will continue to grow and EITC have promised to keep our partnership alive by helping to promote KitAid to their fan base. We also agreed to hold another kit collection day at the game versus Watford next May. All in all, a really great new partnership for KitAid and we are grateful for all of the support we have received in getting this set up. Everton in the Community has...
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Jack Cock – Scorer, Singer, Soldier, Superstar

EVERTON HISTORY Jack Cock – Scorer, Singer, Soldier, Superstar ROB SAWYER (EFC HERITAGE SOCIETY) 18/11/2016 Relatively few Cornishmen have represented Everton but several have left their mark on Merseyside. Mike Trebilcock carved his name into FA Cup folk-lore whilst Nigel Martyn established himself as the finest Goodison goal-keeper since Neville Southall. However, the most remarkable life story is that of Jack Cock: international footballer, team manager, war hero and star of stage and screen. John Gilbert “Jack” Cock, the third child of James (an iron-trimmer) and Eliza, entered the world on 15 November 1893 in the Cornish village of Phillack, close to the port town of Hayle. By the time Jack was seven James had relocated the family from this bucolic setting to Fulham in West London. Jack would earn pocket money selling chocolates to spectators inside Craven Cottage and dream of becoming a footballer. Such hopes faded when James' work took the family to the footballing backwater of Camborne in Cornwall. Nevertheless Jack...
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