1890-1899

Albert Chadwick, the brother of Edgar

Albert Chadwick, the brother of Edgar

When Thomas Chadwick married Susanna Pilkington in 1865 at St Peter's church in Blackburn, both their families had a firm foundation in the grocery trade which enabled them to set up their own local outlet at 66 Darwen Street. It was here that their first child, Albert Llewelyn, was born 1 August 1867. The family then moved to a terraced house on New Park Street – while the business was expanded elsewhere – and it was here that a second child, Edgar Wallace, was born 14 June 1869. He was destined to become an early legend at Everton Football Club.…
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The Scot from the Vale of Leven – John Walker

The Scot from the Vale of Leven – John Walker

Trying to compile an inventory of Scotsmen who have played football for Everton is like compressing springs in an old iron bedstead. Just when you think your task is complete, another one jumps up. The latest addition to this list is John Walker. John Walker He was born on 4 November 1869, in Bonhill, Dunbartonshire and was the second child of John, a carter (driver of horse-drawn vehicles), and his wife, Jane. He was training to be an engine fitter when he began his career with the Alexandria-based Vale of Leven club and represented them in several Scottish FA Cup…
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The Life of Smart Arridge – The Welshman from Sunderland

The Life of Smart Arridge – The Welshman from Sunderland

The wonderfully named Smart Atkinson Arridge was one of Everton’s first Welsh international players – in spite of not qualifying to represent his adopted nation. He was born on 21 June 1872 in Southwick, a village on the north bank of the River Wear which has since been absorbed into Sunderland (it lies a short distance from the Stadium of Light). Smart was the third of four children born to John, a shoemaker originally from Lincolnshire, and Isabella. With Smart still an infant the family uprooted themselves to North Wales via West Yorkshire, residing “above the shop” on the High…
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The Life of Charlie Parry

The Life of Charlie Parry

Charlie Parry, 1894, care of Colorsport A picture is worth a thousand words, they say. Witness the photo of Charlie Parry posing in his Everton kit in 1894: sleeves rolled up, right fist clenched at his side, ball clasped in his left hand, a hint of a sneer on his lips. Here was a footballer you’d want to play alongside rather than against. Charlie enjoyed 6 years with Everton, over two spells, winning the first Football League title to come to Anfield and becoming only the third Everton player to represent Wales (after Job Wildling and Joe Davies). Perhaps in…
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Goodison Park – The New Home of Everton (1892)

Goodison Park – The New Home of Everton (1892)

Billy Smith has been a royal blue bloodhound for many years, sniffing out historic articles about our beloved club in microfilm archives across the region. These nuggets are posted on his excellent Blue Correspondent website (bluecorrespondent.co.uk). Working chronologically, he has reached the 1962/63 season but Billy continues locate and transcribe previously hidden gems from earlier eras. One vein of high-quality content mined by Billy is Athletic News (The Athletic News and Cyclists' Journal, to give it its full title). This Manchester-based weekly newspaper, which ran from 1875 to 1931 was a keen proponent of Association Football in its early decades. Mere Green…
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Union Jack

Union Jack

Jack Bell I was in touch with The former Rugby Union star Tom Smith, some months ago when I discovered that sporting excellence runs in his family. His great-grandfather was John Bell (often referred to as Jack Bell) - one of the brightest Association Football stars of the 1890s, who left an indelible mark at Dumbarton, Everton, Celtic, Preston North End and on the Scottish national team. There was more to the teetotal, moustachioed Bell than his activities on the field of play. He was a pioneer of the unionisation movement in football - a stance which won him few…
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The Allan Maxwell Story

The Allan Maxwell Story

When Allan Maxwell decided to leave his native Scotland to play professional football, he had no idea that eventually he would be involved in one of the most peculiar transfers that ever happened in Victorian England. He was born on 2 April 1869 in the Lanarkshire town of Dalziel, now part of Motherwell, where his father worked as a coal miner. The 1871 census found the family had moved to 30 Sunnyside Rows in Cambuslang where young Allan was recorded as being two years old. By 1881 the Maxwell family had moved to 5 Windsor Street in the town of Hamilton where Allen attended school. Leaving school in his mid-teens, he joined his father working at the mine. It was around this…
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Only Once a Blue, William Rowley

Only Once a Blue, William Rowley

When Everton began their first season at Goodison Park, they needed cover in the position of goalkeeper due to the tragic loss of John Angus following their Championship success at Anfield. Overtures were made to the Scottish international at the time, Jim Wilson, but he could not be lured away from his position at Vale of Leven. So Everton invited Stoke player William Rowley to join them on a visit to Scotland. Born in November 1865 in the Potteries town of Hanley, he was the child of Charles, a clerk, and his wife Sarah. By 1871 however, Sarah was no longer alive and William, along with his father, was living at the home of his grandparents in Hanley. By 1881 he'd moved in with his aunt…
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When The Toffees Outshone The Blades – Anfield Under Illumination

When The Toffees Outshone The Blades – Anfield Under Illumination

The year 1878 not only saw the foundation of the football team that would become Everton FC but, in October of that year, the first experiments in playing artificially-illuminated matches. At Sheffield United’s Bramhall Lane ground, dynamo-powered lamps were mounted on timber gantries to provide the light for a match contested by teams made up of representatives from local clubs. The ‘Blues’ ran out 2-0 winners. But it was here on Merseyside, on 8th January 1890, that one of the most significant trials of this nascent technology occurred. On this occasion Paraffin-fuelled lamps, manufactured by A. C. Wells & Co.…
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Only Once a Blue (Part 10) Roger Ord

Only Once a Blue (Part 10) Roger Ord

Courtesy of Patrick Brennan Born April 1874 in the Northumberland Coal Mining community of Cramlington, Roger Ord was the second son of Thomas and his Wife, Ann. He was working as a Coal Miner when he began his football career keeping goal for his local side Shankhouse who played their league matches in the Northern Alliance. Known as the Black Watch This club entered the FA Cup in 1892 and surprised all concerned by reaching the first round proper but were beaten, 4-0, by Notts County at Trent Bridge. The local scout persuaded Ord to sign for Everton following his…
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