1920-1929

Everton – Bridgetown Barbados

Everton – Bridgetown Barbados

Whilst researching the famous name of Everton around the world, I discovered that there was a very successful team in Barbados which lasted into the latter part of the 20th century. The Barbados Football Association (BFA) was founded in 1910 and celebrated its 100th anniversary in 2010. Originally named the Barbados Amateur Football Association, that name was changed in 1925. The Everton FC of Barbados was founded/established in 1935 in Greater Bridgetown, The name Reynold Culpepper comes to mind as a founder but no evidence has been found as of yet on his involvement , the club was relatively successful…
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Everton – The Baseball Years

Everton – The Baseball Years

The BATS British American Tobacco Team with John Moores (2nd from left in hat), circa 1935 Baseball may be a minority sport in the UK but 80 years ago Merseyside was a hotbed of this popular American pastime. Had it not been for the outbreak of War in 1939 perhaps it would have gained a proper foothold in our sporting life. Folklore has it that William Ralph ‘Dixie’ Dean was once introduced to the legendary Babe Ruth (of Boston Red Sox and New York Yankees fame) at a football match. Dean recalled to journalist John Roberts his encounter with Babe.…
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Herbert Rigsby & Alex Wall, the Zingari Blues

Herbert Rigsby was born on 22 July 1894, in the model village built by philanthropist William Hartley, to house the employees who worked in his fruit preservative factory at Fazakerley. His Surrey born father, Allen, worked at this location, as a foreman, while his mother Frances, looked after the villa that had been allotted to them. The 1911 census revealed that Herbert was living with his parents at that location and was working as a railway clerk. He was playing amateur football with Zingari League side Marine when he joined the army, at the Old Haymarket in Liverpool on 22…
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Dixie Dean’s most cherished medal comes home

Dixie Dean’s most cherished medal comes home

Dixie Dean’s most prized medal came home at the weekend - and Everton have been given the opportunity to secure it for good. Famed memorabilia collector Gordon Wallis bought Dixie Dean’s 1927/28 League Championship winning medal - the season he set the Football League’s 60-goal scoring record - at auction in 1991. But to commemorate the 90th anniversary of Dixie’s remarkable achievement Mr Wallis agreed to bring the cherished medal back to its spiritual home. And at a special event organised by the Everton Heritage Society to celebrate the medal’s return, Mr Wallis hinted that it could one day enjoy…
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Dixie Dean’s most cherished medal is coming home to Goodison Park

Dixie Dean’s most cherished medal is coming home to Goodison Park

Dixie Dean's most cherished medal comes home to Goodison Park The 1927/28 League Championship medal presented to Dixie Dean will be back at Goodison Park on eve of anniversary   One of the most cherished medals in Everton’s history is coming home. The League Championship medal presented to Dixie Dean after his record-breaking 60-goal season in 1927-28 will be back at Goodison Park - on the eve of the 90th anniversary of the legendary And fans are being invited to see it at a special celebration event. Saturday May 5, when Everton entertain Southampton, will be the 90th anniversary of…
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Ted Critchley – My Dad

Ted Critchley – My Dad

Rob Sawyer in Conversation with Doris Holmes (née Critchley) Ted Critchley was the Trevor Steven, Dave Thomas or Alex Scott of his day: fast and skilful with an unerring ability to dribble and deliver crosses into the box from the right flank. Ted made his name as an outside-right with hometown club, Stockport County, whom he joined as a 17-year-old in 1922 after impressing in local football. His 188 games for The Hatters, including a few alongside Harry Catterick Senior, saw him play Second Division football and collect a Manchester Senior Cup winner's medal. Everton, on the look-out for a…
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Jack Cock – Scorer, Singer, Soldier, Superstar

Jack Cock – Scorer, Singer, Soldier, Superstar

Relatively few Cornishmen have represented Everton but several have left their mark on Merseyside. Mike Trebilcock carved his name into FA Cup folk-lore whilst Nigel Martyn established himself as the finest Goodison goal-keeper since Neville Southall.  However, the most remarkable life story is that of Jack Cock: international footballer, team manager, war hero and star of stage and screen. John Gilbert “Jack” Cock, the third child of James (an iron-trimmer) and Eliza, entered the world on 15 November 1893 in the Cornish village of Phillack, close to the port town of Hayle. By the time Jack was seven James had…
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 Archibald Leitch – The Man Who Shaped Goodison Park

At the start of the 20th Century, Goodison Park was arguably, England’s premier football stadium. Today, for better or worse, it is one of the most historic in the land. As you sit in your seat and look across the famous 'Old Lady', two of the stands you see can be credited to Archibald Leitch — stadium designer extraordinaire. Glasgow-born Leitch was an architect specialising in the design of industrial buildings when he was commissioned to design a new 80,000-capacity Ibrox Stadium for Rangers, the club he supported.  The resulting stadium was spectacular but tragedy struck in 1902 when fatalities resulted…
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The Good Doctor of Everton

The Good Doctor of Everton

When William Baxter moved to Liverpool from Clitheroe, he opened his own business, as a Chemist and Druggist, at 259 Great Homer Street in Liverpool. Some years later he married a local girl with whom he began to raise a family. James Clement Baxter, the second child to bless this union, was born in 1857. He attended his local school, dedicated to St Frances Xavier, where he proved to be a bright pupil. He quickly moved on to the school's college, run by the Jesuit Order, from where he won a place to study medicine at the King and Queens…
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In Search of George Brewster

When I was asked for assistance by a fellow historian to find out what became of a former captain of Everton, I set off, armed with the information he had supplied, in the direction of Wigan. The last resting place of the man I was to search for was that of George Brewster, and also to find out the year of his death, because it was missing from the records of both Everton FC and the Scottish FA. I had not been aware, as my train drew slowly in to Wigan North West Station, that I had just passed within…
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