WW1

Alfred John Schofield

Alfred John Schofield

Following in the footsteps of Edgar Chadwick, Alf Schofield first saw the light of day through the mill chimneys of Blackburn in Lancashire.  He was born on 16 July 1876 at 39 Alexandra Street, the fourth child of David, a machine maker, and his wife, Betsy. However, following the early death of her husband, Betsy moved Alfred and his siblings to the comfortable surroundings at 48 Brighton Road in Birkdale where on the 1881 census she is reported to be 'living by own means'. Alfred Schofield joined Everton as an amateur in December 1895, and was first seen by the…
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Only Once a Blue -Part 2: Egerton Stewart-Brown

Only Once a Blue -Part 2: Egerton Stewart-Brown

Only Once a Blue. Part 2: Egerton Stewart-Brown When Everton Football Club signed Dominic Calvert-Lewin from Sheffield United, he became their first player to be officially registered with a double-barrelled surname since Benjamin Howard-Baker in 1920. There is, however, another man who played for Everton before official records began who also had a hyphenated surname. He actually made a guest appearance during Everton's days at Anfield. Egerton Stewart-Brown, far left, with Liverpool Ramblers. On the far-right is J Bruce Ismay, the future Chairman of the White Star Shipping Line Egerton Stewart-Brown was born 31 January 1862, in the township of…
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John Crelley, an FA Cup Winner with Everton

When Everton reached the FA Cup Final in 1906 their opponents, Newcastle United, had previously done a 'league double' over them and were favourites to lift the trophy. The Merseyside club had reached this stage of the competition twice before and had been beaten on both occasions. This time, however, it was to be 'third time lucky' as the trophy found its way to Goodison Park. Playing for Everton that day at left-back was a man who, in many ways, epitomised the type of individual who shaped the development of Victorian Liverpool. His name was John Crelley and he was…
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Jack Brearley, a Prisoner at Ruhleben

Jack Brearley, a Prisoner at Ruhleben. Located beneath the dark smoking chimneys of the gigantic Spandau Munitions Factory on the outskirts of Berlin, the harnessed horse racing track at Ruhleben was hurriedly turned in to an internment camp for the 5,000 or so British civilians who found themselves trapped inside Germany due to the outbreak of World War 1. The game of association football was still in its infant stages, and several of the men held captive, former professional football players, had answered an advertisement to come as trainers and help improve the standard of the game on mainland Europe.…
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Harry Grundy An Everton Winger

When Elizabeth Bradley moved to work in Liverpool from Chirk, she caught the eye of William Grundy, then working as a groom. They were married in 1870, at the Welsh Chapel dedicated to St David on Brownlow Hill. The couple settled at 4 Moorside in Neston where the head of the household worked as a Coachman. It was here, on 15 March 1883, that their sixth child Thomas Henry was born. He became known affectionately as Harry. The 1891 census found the family living at 25 Parkgate Road where William had become the clerk at the local parish church of…
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The Life and Times of John Cameron

It had been just four weeks since the first football knockout competition, won the by The Wanderers, had taken place on the Kennington Oval ground in London, when a boy was born on the South West Coast of Scotland. He was destined to make FA Cup history. John Cameron was born on 13 April 1872 in the Newton district of Ayr, where his family, who were in the grocery business, had finally come to settle. The 1881 census recorded the business premises on Waggon Road, where John was by then an eight-year-old scholar. He later attended Ayr Grammar School. In…
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Everton Heritage Society to hold Remembrance Day Service at Park End plaque 2015

Everton Heritage Society to hold Remembrance Day Service at Park End plaque Service will commemorate Everton and CD Everton players who have fallen in wartime conflict   David France with the memorial plaque to Everton's war heroes Evertonians and other football fans will gather at Goodison Park on Wednesday to pay respects to players who lost their lives during wartime conflict. A remembrance service, organised by the EFC Heritage Society, will be staged at the plaque based at the Park End that commemorates those who have fallen. The service, which begins at 10.50am, will be conducted by the Reverend Harry…
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