Managers

Stephen Burtenshaw

Stephen Burtenshaw

(23 November 1935 - 17 February 2022) Portslade born Steve Burtenshaw started his football career at his local club Brighton & Hove Albion in August 1951, where he spent a staggering fourteen years as a wing half with the Seagulls appearing 237 times. His first game for Brighton was as a young 17-year-old in an away fixture at Exeter City winning 5-1. Not a bad start, eh? His football career came to a pause as he completed his national service with the Army in Germany, but continued his love for football during his time abroad. Service complete, he returned to…
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In Search of John Houlding

In Search of John Houlding

This article is not intended either to praise or to condemn John Houlding for the role he played in the decision made by Everton Football Club to move away from Anfield. It is merely an effort to try and throw some light on this 'larger than life character' who played a big part in establishing the game of Association Football in his home town of Liverpool. Local records reveal that John Houlding was baptised on 4 August 1833 at St Martin-in the-Field church. He was the second of three sons born to Thomas Houlding, a cow keeper, and his wife…
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Gordon Lee – a Life in Football

Gordon Lee – a Life in Football

Steve Zocek Everton F.C. manager Gordon Lee, c.1977 Gordon Lee's family roots were in the Midlands; a small place called Cannock in the county of Staffordshire. As a youngster, Gordon was a keen footballer and could also play cricket. When he was given the opportunity, Gordon chose to play football playing in a wing half/inside forward role. As a young man, he joined his local team, Hednesford Town, who were known as The Pitmen.  They played in the Northern Division of the Birmingham and District League. His enthusiasm for the game earned him a nickname of Onka which means 'unstoppable.'…
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The story behind the photograph – Tom McIntosh – Everton’s First Full-Time Secretary

The story behind the photograph – Tom McIntosh – Everton’s First Full-Time Secretary

Tom McIntosh is a significant off-pitch figure in Everton's story, yet, despite the club's achievements under his watch, he seems to have fallen through the cracks of the club's historical records and his contribution over 16 years is largely overlooked He came from humble beginnings. His Scottish father, Peter, left his native Nairn to become the resident baker at the lunatic asylum in Sedgefield, County Durham. Here he met Eleanor Hunter, an attendant at the asylum. Eleanor's sister Elisabeth and brother-in-law, Thomas Nokes, would also work at the institution (John rose to the position of Chief Attendant). Peter and Eleanor…
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Harry Catterick’s Centenary

Harry Catterick’s Centenary

Last Friday, the Everton FC Heritage Society organised and hosted the ‘Catterick 100’ event to celebrate the life and achievements of Harry Catterick - who would have turned 100 on 26th November. He is remembered and celebrated on the Blue half of Merseyside for his stellar managerial achievements in the 1960s. His trophy haul for the Toffees has been eclipsed only by Howard Kendall. Attendees at the celebration event, held in the People’s Club Lounge at Goodison Park, included members of the Catterick family, Heritage Society members, club officials and supporters. Master of ceremonies, Ken Rogers, led the attendees through…
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The Man Who Coached Everton to Their First League Title

It is the summer of 1891 and the players of Everton Football Club proudly pose with Football League championship trophy which they had recently won for the first time. The club executives, who were at that time in charge of team selection, must take much of the credit for this triumph because of their clever dealings in the transfer market. The extra players they had brought in had proved to be good enough to carry off the championship after finishing second in the previous season. Their fitness and welfare, however, had been placed in the hands of a former Everton…
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The Life and Times of Frank Brettell

The name of Everton forward Francis Edward Brettell first appeared on the Liverpool census in 1871 when he was reported as living at No 5 house, Court 13, on Boundary Street. His Father, William Brettell, listed his occupation as that of a nut and bolt maker, and gave his birthplace as West Bromwich in Staffordshire. His wife Harriet, the mother of Frank, was  born in Devonshire. Nine year old Frank, born at Smethwick in Staffordshire, was the eldest of her three children. The premature death of Harriet, in 1881, saw Frank, along with rest of the family, move in with…
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