1970-1979

Buck – Mick Buckley Remembered

Buck – Mick Buckley Remembered

(4 November 1953 – 7 October 2013) By Rob Sawyer Mick Buckley was a fine young footballer who had the great fortune to play for Everton FC - but the equal misfortune to have to follow immediately in the footsteps of Colin Harvey, Howard Kendall and Alan Ball and suffer from the inevitable comparisons. Michael John Buckley was born to Roy and Jean Buckley in Salford on 4 November 1953; he was the eldest of five children raised in the Salford and South Manchester areas. Like his father, Mick followed Manchester United – he idolised Denis Law and his school…
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Jimmy Husband – An Appreciation

Jimmy Husband – An Appreciation

Jimmy Husband (15 October 1947 – 9 March 2024) An Appreciation The sad news of the death of Jimmy Husband comes just weeks after the passing of John Hurst, his teammate in the 1965 FA Youth Cup-winning side and the legendary championship-winning team of 1969/70. Harry Catterick spread the net wide in his search for the best young talent in the 1960s, and was hot on the trail of a precocious attacking talent from Newcastle, who had England schoolboy honours, by the name of James Husband. But Everton were not the only side keen to get the teenager’s signature. Jimmy,…
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John Hurst (1947-2024)

John Hurst (1947-2024)

A Tribute by Rob Sawyer ‘The Last of the Corinthians’ is a phrase used to describe one of Everton’s great captains, Brian Labone. However, John Hurst, his defensive partner in Everton’s great side of the late 1960s, embodied many of the same qualities that gave Labone his sobriquet. John in the mid 1960s Like Roger Kenyon, who would also come through the ranks at Bellefield and be unlucky not to collect full international honours, John hailed from Blackpool. A centre-forward and inside-forward as a youth, the leggy Lancastrian had represented Blackpool schoolboys and also received England youth honours. Harry Catterick…
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John Turner – from a Ram to Japan

John Turner – from a Ram to Japan

Steve Zocek  The name of John Turner would not be particularly familiar to most Evertonians, whatever their age. It would be a stiff challenge in a pub quiz to guess his connection to Everton in relation to the pre-season tour of Japan under manager Howard Kendall in 1981. A Geordie by birth, he never hid the fact that he was a fanatical Sunderland supporter who would go along with his father to watch his heroes –notably Charlie Hurley, Len Ashurst, Martin Harvey, Brian Clough and Ernie Taylor – at the famous old Roker Park in the early 1960s. A former…
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Everton v Keflavik – European Cup, Sept 1970

Everton v Keflavik – European Cup, Sept 1970

In the week commencing 14 September 1970, Edward Heath was in residence in 10 Downing Street, Tears of a Clown by Smokey Robinson and the Miracles was top of the charts, back and white television sets were still in higher demand than the newly introduced colour sets, and one hundred pounds back then would now (in 2023) have the purchasing power of around £1,900. Meanwhile, the newspapers rocked the music scene with reports of the shocking death of the brilliant young guitarist Jimi Hendrix, as a result of a barbiturate overdose on 18 September 1970. The 'Twenty-Seven Club' had claimed…
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Getting it Wright – (Son of My Father Part 18)

Getting it Wright – (Son of My Father Part 18)

Billy and Anthony Wright As well as being the son of Billy Wright, Anthony is also the great-nephew of Everton's World Cup full back Tommy Wright, and the cousin of Everton Ladies league winner Emma Wright-Cates. Quite an Everton family! Billy Wright Billy Wright (Photo by Bob Thomas Sports Photography via Getty Images) Ray Minshull was in charge of the youth set up when young Billy came to the attention of the club. It was touch and go at one stage, because Liverpool were keen to take the youngster on too. There was a scout that represented Liverpool that actually…
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Sir Dobbo – Goodison Aristocrat

Sir Dobbo – Goodison Aristocrat

Rob Sawyer in Conversation with Martin Dobson (speaking in October 2013) The 1970’s  success at Anfield cast a long, dark, shadow across Stanley Park to Goodison. Blue beacons of light were few and far between but, perhaps, Martin Dobson shone brightest. Christened “Sir Dobbo” by Andy King, in humorous deference to the class he exuded on and off the pitch, this thoroughbred midfielder’s arrival from Burnley in August 1974 signalled the departure of the last member of the Holy Trinity. Cultured and powerful with an eye for goal – there is no greater compliment than to state that he would…
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Stephen Burtenshaw

Stephen Burtenshaw

(23 November 1935 - 17 February 2022) Portslade born Steve Burtenshaw started his football career at his local club Brighton & Hove Albion in August 1951, where he spent a staggering fourteen years as a wing half with the Seagulls appearing 237 times. His first game for Brighton was as a young 17-year-old in an away fixture at Exeter City winning 5-1. Not a bad start, eh? His football career came to a pause as he completed his national service with the Army in Germany, but continued his love for football during his time abroad. Service complete, he returned to…
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Patricia Pearson

Patricia Pearson

Kick Off - The First Lady of Football on Television     In the north west of England, there was a Friday night football programme through out the seventies called 'Kick Off', featuring all of the north west clubs in the four divisions of the Football League. The emphasis would be on the big games that were being played that weekend featuring the region’s clubs. Interviews with players, managers, including action of the region’s teams from the week before, would feature in the thirty-minute show.  The presenter was Gerald Sinstadt who joined Granada in 1969/70 until 1980-81. Two days later, a regular…
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Spot on – The first European Cup shoot-out

Spot on – The first European Cup shoot-out

This article first appeared in the Champions Journal - reproduced here by kind permission EFCHS member Simon Hart steps up and takes a deep breath to look back at the first European Cup shoot-out WORDS Simon Hart | ILLUSTRATION Thomke Meyer It is five decades ago now but Wolfgang Kleff is still not allowed to forget the night he created a football first. “Older fans who lived through that time talk to me about it,” says the 74-year-old. “It’s part of the history of Borussia Mönchengladbach.” The ‘it’? The first save by a goalkeeper in a European Cup penalty shoot-out.…
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