1960-1969

The ‘real’ story behind Everton’s enduring anthem Z-Cars

The ‘real’ story behind Everton’s enduring anthem Z-Cars

"When did Everton first run out to Z-Cars at Goodison?" We’re closer than we’ve ever been to a definitive answer     Goodison Park, home of Everton FC   It's a question which has been asked almost as many times as it has been played: When did Everton first run out to Z-Cars at Goodison? And today, thanks to some splendid research from the Everton Heritage Society, we’re closer than we’ve ever been to a definitive answer. That’s closer. But still not spot on. Because a mystery which has lasted half-a-century deserves to retain some allure.  And a theme as evocative,…
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Harry Catterick’s Centenary

Harry Catterick’s Centenary

Last Friday, the Everton FC Heritage Society organised and hosted the ‘Catterick 100’ event to celebrate the life and achievements of Harry Catterick - who would have turned 100 on 26th November. He is remembered and celebrated on the Blue half of Merseyside for his stellar managerial achievements in the 1960s. His trophy haul for the Toffees has been eclipsed only by Howard Kendall. Attendees at the celebration event, held in the People’s Club Lounge at Goodison Park, included members of the Catterick family, Heritage Society members, club officials and supporters. Master of ceremonies, Ken Rogers, led the attendees through…
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‘Money Can’t Buy Us Love: Everton in the 1960s’ – By Gavin Buckland

‘Money Can’t Buy Us Love: Everton in the 1960s’ – By Gavin Buckland

Two strong-willed, complicated, men form the axis of a new book by Gavin Buckland which explores, in greater detail than ever before, Everton during the trophy-laden 1960s Rob Sawyer For those who have only been following Everton since the 1990s, you’ll have known the Blues as the plucky underdogs – the Dogs of War, even. It’s been the People’s Club, punching above its weight against opponents with much greater financial clout. For these younger supporters - even in this more financially stable and ambitious Moshiri-led era - it must be hard to envisage a time when the Toffees were the…
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Davie Wilson, the First £100,000 Everton Player…Almost

Davie Wilson played for Glasgow Rangers from 1956 until 1967. During that time, he made 373 appearances for the Ibrox club. Davie was an outside left who could play anywhere and he wasn’t shy in front of goal either, finding the net 157 times. This included six goals in one game against Falkirk in 1962 which is still a post-war record. Unbeknown to me previously, he caught the eye of Everton when in 1962 he was approached by the Merseyside outfit. Jimmy Greaves at the time was the British record transfer with a fee of £99,999 from AC Milan to…
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FA Cup Games at Goodison park ( without the Blues)

  The victorious Notts County team pose with the FA Cup. Photo: PA FA Cup Finals On 31st March 1894 Two years after construction, Goodison Park was chosen by the Football Association to host to hold an FA Cup Final, Notts County beat Bolton Wanderers, watched by crowd of 37,000. County running out 4 goals to 1 winner The Magpies were a Second Division club at this point, but Logan did not let this deter him, scoring 21 goals in 21 games and guiding the club to their first FA Cup Final. To get there, Notts eliminated three clubs from…
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Everton in the League Cup at Goodison Park

The League Cup was introduced to the top four divisions in the 1960/61 season. For the first seven years the final was played over two legs (home and away), before being moved to Wembley in 1967. The competition has had many sponsors starting in the 1981/82 season when it was known as the Milk Cup until 1985/86. It then had a change of sponsorship as Littlewoods took over, then Rumbelows and many more. Everton’s first involvement saw them play their first and only game in the first round, drawn at home to Accrington Stanley. Evertonians didn’t appear to take the…
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World Cup 1966 at Goodison Park

World Cup 1966 at Goodison Park

In 1966, England was the host nation for the world’s most glamourous football event. Seven cities were chosen to stage games, with Liverpool being one. London, Manchester, Sunderland, Middlesbrough, Birmingham and Sheffield completed the set. Goodison Park in those days was a top stadium with great facilities and a capacity over 60,000. The stadium was admired and envied by many clubs in England, but this was to be shown to a worldwide audience. World champions Brazil played Bulgaria in Group 3 at Goodison Park on 12th July in front of 47,308 fans. There were no surprises, as Brazil led at the break,…
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From West Derby to New South Wales: The Footballing Odyssey of Ian Hillsdon

By Rob Sawyer   Ian Hillsdon with the Dixie Dean statue in 2003(courtesy Hillsdon family) For every local lad who makes the grade at Everton, scores fall by the wayside. Some teenagers fail to develop as expected, some lack the drive and mental toughness to succeed whilst others are just plain unlucky. Of those rejected some quietly slip out of the game, whilst others have a second chance at a lower league club. An intrepid few go further afield to fulfil their footballing dreams. A prime example of the latter category is Ian Hillsdon. Born in 1937, the left-back from…
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1966 hero gets his 1962/63 championship medal at last

1966 hero gets his 1962/63 championship medal at last

Everton legend Derek Temple was finally been presented with a League title medal, 53 years after helping the Blues lift the trophy. Temple had played in five games for Everton in the Championship winning side of 1963, but at the time that wasn’t enough to be presented with a title winner’s medal. However, in the years since then, rules have changed and today Leicester’s Mark Schwarzer will collect his second successive title medal despite having not played for either of his clubs. So, the Everton FC Heritage Society set about the task of asking the FA to make sure Temple…
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Why Leicester Fosse?

History will be made today when the present Premier League champions take to the field for what is their first ever FA Cup tie at Goodison Park. The visitors were formed in 1884 by a group of young men from a local evangelical chapel who decided to form a football team that they chose to call Leicester Fosse. This suffix was chosen because the old Roman Road, known as the Fosse Way, had once passed through the area and a military encampment was constructed to protect it from attack near to the spot where it forded the River Soar. The…
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