The Holy Trinity of Our Forefathers

DR JAMES CLEMENT BAXTER   Previously there has been a concerted effort by the Everton Shareholders Association and particularly by one fellow Evertonian Paul Wharton to endorse our song “And if you know your history”. Paul has been dubbed the Everton Sherlock Holmes. He has been driven to find out the true story behind our clubs formation and the founder fathers who delivered to us this fantastic club. When I read about our clubs past it really does make your heart go whoohhoo! It is now generally accepted that the following gentleman were the driving force in forming and making Everton. Ben Swift Chambers, John Houlding, James Baxter, George Mahon, John McKenna and Will Cuff all read from the same prayer book about football on Merseyside in its infancy. Paul arranged fantastic nights for the story of George Mahon and then Will Cuff to be told but our education of Everton would not be complete without an in depth story of a man who...
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A Fascinating Insight into Will Cuff

  Arriving through the double doors of The People?s Club Lounge at Goodison Park I was greeted by the ever-friendly face of David Starsky. It?s always great seeing David. I do enjoy his zest for life. We were present for the rather special occasion that was the unveiling of a quite amazing piece of artwork by Chris Wilson, this being an exceptional, life-like portrait of Mr Everton ? a man whose achievements are difficult to be tailored into words... one Will Cuff. As ever with such events organized by the Everton Heritage Society, and in particular Paul Wharton, the evening was informative, educational, interesting and superbly organized. I?m just disappointed there isn't more of them. Paul Wharton began proceedings with a short introduction explaining a little about Will Cuff and the significance of the portrait. You see the original portrait was created by Frank Copnall, a local artist who completed a good 800 portraits back then. One of those was of Will Cuff....
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EVERTON LEAGUE CHAMPIONS 1986/87

Everton started off the new campaign licking their wounds after conceding the league and FA cup "double" to their rivals Liverpool the previous season. In came new signings Dave Watson who became Everton's record signing for £1m, also Paul Power, Kevin Langley and Neil Adams. Out went Gary Lineker as he left to join his new manager Terry Venables at Barcelona. Everton started their campaign where they had become accustomed by playing at their "second home" Wembley in the charity shield against Liverpool. Like so many times the name of Ian Rush cursed Everton as he cancelled out Adrian Heath's 80th minute goal with an 88th minute equaliser as both clubs shared the shield. The league campaign began with a home game against Nottingham Forest with Kevin Sheedy netting a brace in front of 35,198 supporters. Everton remained unbeaten for the rest of the month of August with two away draws against Sheffield Wednesday and Coventry City respectively. September's month opened with a convincing 3-1...
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The Life of Ken Birch

R.I.P. former Everton right-half Kenny Birch has died at the age of 81. Kenny Birch, who played 45 times for the Blues in the 1950s, passed away after a long and brave battle with illness. Born in Birkenhead, he joined Everton as a junior and made his debut in April 1956 in a 1-1 draw at Sheffield United alongside the likes of TE Jones, Peter Farrell, Tommy Eglington and Jimmy Harris. The following season he played 30 times in League and FA Cup, scoring his one and only goal for the Club in a 4-2 victory at Maine Road against Manchester City, finding a way past the legendary Bert Trautmann. The 1957/58 campaign saw him add another 11 appearances to his tally before he was allowed to move to Southampton. Later in his career, Birch played for Bangor City, helping them to a Welsh Cup success in 1962 that gave him the chance to play in the European Cup Winners' Cup. Bangor were drawn against...
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Keys and Warmby — The Duo from Derby

In preparation for life in the Football League, Everton Football Club made several new signings during the summer of 1888. Two of them, Keys and Warmby, had joined them from Derby County. Despite the fact that the local newspapers make no reference to their background, they were in fact related by marriage and had reached the Mersey Seaport by two slightly different routes. William Henry Warmby was born, 1863, in South Yorkshire where he began his football career with his local team, Rotherham Town. Sometime around 1883 he moved to Derby where he took up a job as an engine fitter (Midland Railway?) and played his football with a team made up of players from the congregation at the church of St Luke. They were one of the lesser known teams in the town and played on a small ground at Peat Street. On November 8th, 1884 they travelled to face Wolverhampton Wanderers in an FA Cup tie, on their home...
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The Life of Hunter Hart

Hunter Hart was always recognisable by a distinctive quiff which pre-dated that of Wolves' Billy Wright. He served Everton with distinction on the field in the 1920s and behind a desk in the 1930s but, unfortunately, his association with the club he loved was to end prematurely, as was his life. Born on Glasgow on 11 March 1897 to Alexander (a carter) and Jessie, Hart grew up less than half a mile from Celtic's stadium. By the age of 14, living in Shettleston, Lanarkshire, he had lost the sight in one eye in, what was described as, "a childhood accident". He was never on record talking about this disability and it certainly did not hold back his football career.   He made his name with Parkhead Juniors FC in Scottish non league ("Junior") football. Spotted by Airdrieonians' manager John Chapman, Hart signed for the league outfit at the start of the 1918/19 season. His Airdrie debut, as a 21-year-old inside-forward, was on 18...
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Jack Cock – Scorer, Singer, Soldier, Superstar

EVERTON HISTORY Jack Cock – Scorer, Singer, Soldier, Superstar ROB SAWYER (EFC HERITAGE SOCIETY) 18/11/2016 Relatively few Cornishmen have represented Everton but several have left their mark on Merseyside. Mike Trebilcock carved his name into FA Cup folk-lore whilst Nigel Martyn established himself as the finest Goodison goal-keeper since Neville Southall. However, the most remarkable life story is that of Jack Cock: international footballer, team manager, war hero and star of stage and screen. John Gilbert “Jack” Cock, the third child of James (an iron-trimmer) and Eliza, entered the world on 15 November 1893 in the Cornish village of Phillack, close to the port town of Hayle. By the time Jack was seven James had relocated the family from this bucolic setting to Fulham in West London. Jack would earn pocket money selling chocolates to spectators inside Craven Cottage and dream of becoming a footballer. Such hopes faded when James' work took the family to the footballing backwater of Camborne in Cornwall. Nevertheless Jack...
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Alan Ball Remembered DVD

Former Everton star Ronny Goodlass is will have a DVD on sale at St Luke's Church and the Winslow every home game. The DVD pays tribute to one of the Club's most iconic legends, Alan Ball. Along with the DVD is a special tribute programme for the Ball of Fire play, both on sale for a special price of £9.99 instead of £12.99. Ronny will at St Luke's to autograph the items. Winger Goodlass was a boot boy for Ball in his youth and came to be in awe of the man who scored 79 goals in 251 games during a dazzling five-year spell at Goodison Park. The highlight of that stint was helping Harry Catterick's great side ease to the League Championship title in 1970 as part of the ‘Holy Trinity’ alongside Colin Harvey and Howard Kendall. The DVD re-lives all the best Ball moments through his own words and those of the men who knew him best. Goodlass, Kendall, Joe Royle and Graeme...
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In Search of John Houlding-by Tony Onslow

This article is not intended to either praise or condemn John Houlding for the role he played in the decision, made by Everton Football Club, to move away from Anfield. It is merely an effort to try and throw some light on this “larger than life character” who played a big part in the establishing the game of Association Football in his home town of Liverpool.   Local records reveal that John Houlding was baptised, 4-08-1833, at St Martin-in the-Field church and that he was the second of three sons born to Thomas Houlding, a Cow keeper, and his wife Alice. The family reside at 19 Tenderden Street where the income from Thomas Houlding’s occupation enables him to provide his children with a good standard of education and a comfortable home in which to live.   The 1851 census reveal that John Houlding is still living in Tenderden Street where, along with his younger brother William, he lists his occupation as “Auditing at home”....
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