Everton in 1915 – Pete Jones

1915 was a bittersweet year for Everton FC. The 1914-15 season was played entirely during wartime and was probably the most controversial ever, resulting in divisions within sport that still find echoes today, and yet Everton were able to celebrate their second league title. Before a ball was kicked British forces became locked in a constant struggle alongside the French against a German army that was the best in the world. By the time Everton lifted the trophy in late April the British had suffered appalling losses, with the original expeditionary force all but destroyed; that the war had lasted until the spring of 1915 with no sign of a conclusion was a surprise to almost everyone. Although press censorship kept the home public unaware of the realities of the war, the twists and turns of the 1914-15 season must have diverted them from their anxieties. For Everton fans in the trenches the arrival of the results must have been what...
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Everton and KitAid

Rob Sawyer for EFC Heritage Society 11/10/2016 Thanks to an act of generosity in a time of adversity, a corner of Malawi, 5,000 miles from Goodison Park, will be forever Everton. John Mulcahy was a lifelong Blue – attending his first match in April 1976 when Everton defeated Stoke 2-1. John had Noonan Syndrome (NS), which, in spite of being relatively commonplace and having a major impact on lives, remains a comparatively little-known condition. The syndrome did not stop him from becoming a Lower Bullens season ticket holder and regular attendee at away fixtures. Sadly John’s health deteriorated in the last five years of his life before he passed away on December 21st 2014, aged 47. John’s parents, Frances and Bob, were determined to find a deserving new home for John’s collection of 23 Everton shirts; they located it thanks to KitAid. The charity was founded by Derrick Williams, who, on a humanitarian visit to Tanzania in 1988, was struck by the positive...
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A Tribute to Matt Woods

By Rob Sawyer 14/10/2014 Matt Woods (1 NOVEMBER 1931 - 26 SEPTEMBER 2014) Skelmersdale-born Maurice “Matt” Woods, a centre-half on Everton’s books in the 1950s, passed away on 26 September aged 82. He had been playing as a wing-half in the Wigan Sunday League when his uncle wrote to Everton requesting a trial for his nephew. Having impressed in the B team, he signed amateur forms at 15 and by the 1949-50 season he was a regular in the Reserves – alongside the likes of Don Donovan, Tommy Clinton, Wally “Nobby” Fielding, Jimmy O’Neill and Harry Catterick. An early Reserves appearance brought praise in the local press: Everton Reserves ‘Derby’ Victory 24 December 1949, Evening Express Blues’ Juniors Clever Another of Everton’s younger players who showed up well was right half Matt Woods, who comes from Skelmersdale. Possibly a little slow on occasion, Woods at the same time proved that he realises the requirement of the complete wing-half and his use of the ball was always judicious. Having...
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Everton and Lille

By Pete Jones 05/10/2014 It is a surprising fact but Everton have never played a French club in competitive action, so our visit to Lille on Thursday 23 October will be a first. However, there are Everton links to the Lille area, but you have to go back nearly a century to find them. The Great War Lille, the largest city in northern France was in the war zone in the autumn of 1914 after the German invasion was halted at the battle of the Marne. The fighting moved ever north as both sides tried to outflank each other. Lille fell after a short siege on 13th October and the focus of the fighting moved to the higher ground between the city and the Belgian town of Ypres 17 miles to the north west . Here the Germans brought up hastily gathered reserves and attempted to punch through to the Channel ports. British, Indian and French forces held on to Ypres by the...
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The Ted Sagar Story

ON BRODSWORTH CINDER PITCHES TED SAGAR LEARNED TO MAKE HIS WONDER SAVES May 14, 1949. The Liverpool Football Echo Twenty Glorious Years By Ted Sagar As Told To Allan Robinson Ted Sagar, Everton’s long-serving international goalkeeper –he is in his 21st year with the club 0begins today the romantic story of his football life, and tells of his early hopes and disappointments and of his first big transfer from one pit team to another which put him on the route to Goodison Park and twenty years of football glory. My age? –it’s no secret I was born in February 1910, which makes me 39. Most top-class footballers hand up their boots before reaching that age but I feel as fit as I did when I first started playing big-time football, and I intend to continue just as long as I can be of service to the best club in the country my first and only love –Everton F.C. maybe my fitness is not unassociated with my...
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