The Hope of Everton

The Hope of Everton In November 1890, the Everton executive dispatched their club captain Andrew Hannah back to his native Scotland and instructed him to find a player who would strengthen the side and help them clinch the Football League Championship. They informed him he could offer a signing on fee of £50 plus a weekly wage of £3 and 10s a week. Hannah later returned with Hope Ramsey Robertson who had agreed to join the Anfield club from Partick Thistle. He had been born ,17-1-1868, in the Govan area of Glasgow and was the third child born to Assurance Agent John Robertson and wife Catherine. The 1881 census finds the family now living in the Whiteinch area of the City where the young Hope, now 13, is working as a Rivet Heater in a local shipyard. He began his football career with a team who played under the name of Minerva, before joining a Partick Thistle club who, at the time,...
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The Merseyside Derby Game

The Merseyside Derby Game The people of the Merseyside “turn in on themselves” today as their two vintage football clubs line up to face each other for the 194th time. No other City in England can claim to have staged more local Derby games, at the top level of English football, than Liverpool. The atmosphere will be electric yet when these two deadly rivals first locked horns with each other it was on a football pitch that has long since faded in to local folklore. The date was April 1893 and the occasion was the final of Liverpool Senior Cup which took place, in front of 10,000 people, on the present home of Bootle Cricket Club at Wadham Road. The encounter was settled by a single goal, that was scored, in favour of Liverpool, by Scotsman Tom Wylie who had once played for Everton but, following the acrimonious “split” had chosen to remain at Anfield. His new club nevertheless, were members...
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Joseph Davies, the Welsh International from Shropshire

Joseph Davies, the Welsh International from Shropshire. The picture above shows the last resting of Joseph Davies who played for Everton during the season that they became founder members of the Football League. He had been born, 27-6-1869, at St Martins in North West Shropshire and baptised at Preesgwyn Methodist Chapel. Records reveal that he was the son of Stephen Davies, a Blacksmith at the local Coal Mine, and his wife Harriet. Both of them had been born in St Martins. The 1881 census finds the family living Chirk Bank Row in Weston Rhyn where Joseph, along with his two brothers, is listed as a Scholar. On leaving school he began working at the local Colliery and was playing for Chirk AAA from when he joined Everton in November 1888. It is reasonable to assume that he lived, during his time with Everton, at the family home because he could catch a train from the tiny local Railway Station (now closed)...
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Joe McClure

Joe McClure Everton Career 1929-1933  Researched by Billy Smith, Photographs supplied by Brendon Connelly & Compiled By Richard Gilliam On Behalf of the EFC Heritage Society WikipediaEVERTON SIGN WALLSEND PLAYER Hartlepool Mail Monday 4 November 1929 Joseph Henry McClure, a young half-back now playing for Wallsend. in the North-Eastern League, was signed on by Everton following his club's game with Hartlepool’s Reserves on Saturday. McClure, who plays on either wing, was on the books of Preston North End before joining Wallsend, and is 22 years of age, 5ft. 9m. height, and weighs11ist. 4lb EVERTON RESERVES 7 WEST BROMWICH ALBION RESERVES 3 November 11th 1929. Liverpool Post and Mercury. Everton played their best game of the season against the Albion at Goodison Park in the Central League game and won by 7 goals to 3. The whole team excelled in footcraft, combination, and skill Wilkinson was the spearhead of the attack and in scoring five of the seven goals revealed speed, skill, expert ball distribution, and a deadly finish. Ritchie and Easton scored Everton's...
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Andrew Gibson, The Blue from Dalmellington

Although destined never to play a Football League match for the club, Andrew Gibson played a leading role in the years leading up to Everton becoming founder members of the new organisation.  He had been at the club for two seasons when the above picture was taken and he had travelled a somewhat roundabout route to reach the town where he would spend the rest of his days. Andrew Gibson was born on 31st January, 1864, at the number 3 house in the High Main Street of the Ayrshire market town of Dalmellington. His Father and Grandfather, both named Alexander, belonged to the accident order of Fleshers (qualified slaughter men) thus making the family prominent members of the local community. The 1881 census lets us know that Andrew, now 17, had moved to the town of Kilmarnock which was expanding due to the fact that it is now the headquarters of Glasgow and South Western Railway Company. He was living with relatives...
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The Life of Ken Birch

R.I.P. former Everton right-half Kenny Birch has died at the age of 81. Kenny Birch, who played 45 times for the Blues in the 1950s, passed away after a long and brave battle with illness. Born in Birkenhead, he joined Everton as a junior and made his debut in April 1956 in a 1-1 draw at Sheffield United alongside the likes of TE Jones, Peter Farrell, Tommy Eglington and Jimmy Harris. The following season he played 30 times in League and FA Cup, scoring his one and only goal for the Club in a 4-2 victory at Maine Road against Manchester City, finding a way past the legendary Bert Trautmann. The 1957/58 campaign saw him add another 11 appearances to his tally before he was allowed to move to Southampton. Later in his career, Birch played for Bangor City, helping them to a Welsh Cup success in 1962 that gave him the chance to play in the European Cup Winners' Cup. Bangor were drawn against...
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Keys and Warmby — The Duo from Derby

In preparation for life in the Football League, Everton Football Club made several new signings during the summer of 1888. Two of them, Keys and Warmby, had joined them from Derby County. Despite the fact that the local newspapers make no reference to their background, they were in fact related by marriage and had reached the Mersey Seaport by two slightly different routes. William Henry Warmby was born, 1863, in South Yorkshire where he began his football career with his local team, Rotherham Town. Sometime around 1883 he moved to Derby where he took up a job as an engine fitter (Midland Railway?) and played his football with a team made up of players from the congregation at the church of St Luke. They were one of the lesser known teams in the town and played on a small ground at Peat Street. On November 8th, 1884 they travelled to face Wolverhampton Wanderers in an FA Cup tie, on their home...
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The Life of Hunter Hart

Hunter Hart was always recognisable by a distinctive quiff which pre-dated that of Wolves' Billy Wright. He served Everton with distinction on the field in the 1920s and behind a desk in the 1930s but, unfortunately, his association with the club he loved was to end prematurely, as was his life. Born on Glasgow on 11 March 1897 to Alexander (a carter) and Jessie, Hart grew up less than half a mile from Celtic's stadium. By the age of 14, living in Shettleston, Lanarkshire, he had lost the sight in one eye in, what was described as, "a childhood accident". He was never on record talking about this disability and it certainly did not hold back his football career.   He made his name with Parkhead Juniors FC in Scottish non league ("Junior") football. Spotted by Airdrieonians' manager John Chapman, Hart signed for the league outfit at the start of the 1918/19 season. His Airdrie debut, as a 21-year-old inside-forward, was on 18...
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Jack Cock – Scorer, Singer, Soldier, Superstar

EVERTON HISTORY Jack Cock – Scorer, Singer, Soldier, Superstar ROB SAWYER (EFC HERITAGE SOCIETY) 18/11/2016 Relatively few Cornishmen have represented Everton but several have left their mark on Merseyside. Mike Trebilcock carved his name into FA Cup folk-lore whilst Nigel Martyn established himself as the finest Goodison goal-keeper since Neville Southall. However, the most remarkable life story is that of Jack Cock: international footballer, team manager, war hero and star of stage and screen. John Gilbert “Jack” Cock, the third child of James (an iron-trimmer) and Eliza, entered the world on 15 November 1893 in the Cornish village of Phillack, close to the port town of Hayle. By the time Jack was seven James had relocated the family from this bucolic setting to Fulham in West London. Jack would earn pocket money selling chocolates to spectators inside Craven Cottage and dream of becoming a footballer. Such hopes faded when James' work took the family to the footballing backwater of Camborne in Cornwall. Nevertheless Jack...
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In Search of John Houlding-by Tony Onslow

This article is not intended to either praise or condemn John Houlding for the role he played in the decision, made by Everton Football Club, to move away from Anfield. It is merely an effort to try and throw some light on this “larger than life character” who played a big part in the establishing the game of Association Football in his home town of Liverpool.   Local records reveal that John Houlding was baptised, 4-08-1833, at St Martin-in the-Field church and that he was the second of three sons born to Thomas Houlding, a Cow keeper, and his wife Alice. The family reside at 19 Tenderden Street where the income from Thomas Houlding’s occupation enables him to provide his children with a good standard of education and a comfortable home in which to live.   The 1851 census reveal that John Houlding is still living in Tenderden Street where, along with his younger brother William, he lists his occupation as “Auditing at home”....
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