The Ted Sagar Story

ON BRODSWORTH CINDER PITCHES TED SAGAR LEARNED TO MAKE HIS WONDER SAVES May 14, 1949. The Liverpool Football Echo Twenty Glorious Years By Ted Sagar As Told To Allan Robinson Ted Sagar, Everton’s long-serving international goalkeeper –he is in his 21st year with the club 0begins today the romantic story of his football life, and tells of his early hopes and disappointments and of his first big transfer from one pit team to another which put him on the route to Goodison Park and twenty years of football glory. My age? –it’s no secret I was born in February 1910, which makes me 39. Most top-class footballers hand up their boots before reaching that age but I feel as fit as I did when I first started playing big-time football, and I intend to continue just as long as I can be of service to the best club in the country my first and only love –Everton F.C. maybe my fitness is not unassociated with my...
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Lovers Lane – Thomas Keates

GOODISON PARK November 23, 1912. Evening Express Liverpool. Memories of Everton's Ground. Famous Crickters' Visit. By the Old ‘Un, “Goodison Park eh –a funny park,” said my cousin Bill. He was down from “Brum” for the day, a cheap tripper. He came to see the “Villa” bury “Everton,” but as it fell upon the day the “Villa” were laid low, he attended the funeral. Some people who attend funerals find it difficult to maintain the grave demenou; and mute solemnity appropriate to the sad occasions. Bill had no difficulty. He was genuinely downhearted. His before-the-match gaiety was badly eclipsed by his after-the-match mortification. He hadn't a laugh left in him. When a fellow's team's beaten before his eyes, life's scarcely worth living, is it? Especially when you've come a long way to see the smash-up. We may take the reverses of the team we shout for, and swear by, too sadly, and excite the sneers of the cynic, who has never had the football...
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The Oxford Blues of Everton Football Club

by Tony Onslow The young football fan who today watches the highly paid Premier League stars of the modern era will find it difficult to visualise the generation of footballers who, long ago, earned a good living outside of the game and played football without reward because they loved to do so. Confined mostly to the South of England, many of them had first become acquainted with the association game at public school and then expanded their knowledge and skills at universities such as Oxford. Here, if noted by the selectors, they could be chosen to represent their University and be awarded an honour that was referred to as a “blue”. Two of these noble amateurs, who earned this distinction, later found themselves wearing the blue jersey of Everton Football Club. The first of them was William Charles Jordan. The son of a brewery owner, he was born on 9th December, 1885 at Oldbury in Warwickshire and attended Kind Edward College in Birmingham...
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Everton Tour of Argentina – 1909

EVERTON F.C. “GAMBETEANDO.” DIRECTOR BAINBRIDGE'S COMPLETE REVIEW OF THE TOUR IN THE ARGENTINE. July 24 1909. The Liverpool Football Echo WHAT THEY DID & HOW THEY DID IT The following is the exhaustive diary of Mr. E.A.Bainbridge, of the Everton Football Club, who, together with Mr. A.E.Wade, was in charge of the Argentine tour. Mr. Bainbridge writes as follows: - On the 13 th May last, numerous friends and admires assembled at Lime-street Station, Liverpool to wish bon voyage to the Everton football team and officials on their departure by the four p.m. train to play a series of matches in two of the South American Republics. The number of players including the trainer (fourteen) accompanied by Messrs, E.A.Bainbridge and AR Wade directors, were as follows: - C.H. Berry, R. Balmer, J. MaConnachie, D.Rafferty, V. Harris, R. Clifford, H. Adamson, JD Taylor, T. Jones, W. Lacey, BC Freeman, W. White, and H. Mountford, and of course the irrepressible John Elliott, who has served the club...
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